Primal Gourmet https://cookprimalgourmet.com Easy and Delicious Paleo and Whole30 Recipes Fri, 17 Jan 2020 04:03:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 Copycat Ding’s Coleslaw – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/dings-coleslaw-whole30-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/dings-coleslaw-whole30-paleo#respond Wed, 08 Jan 2020 23:07:59 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5394

An easy and healthy copycat version of the famous Ding's Coleslaw from Houston's and Hillstone Restaurants. So good you'll be eating it with ALL THE THINGS!

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If you’ve ever been to one of the many Houston’s or Hillstone restaurant locations in the States, you’ve likely tried their signature Ding’s Coleslaw. Personally, I always order it with a full rack of ribs and the shoestring fries. It is, hands down, one of my favourite meals of all time. It’s also a very nostalgic one because the Houston’s in North Miami is where we would sometimes go to celebrate a special family occasion.

My grandparents moved to North Miami Beach from Queens, New York, back in the mid-90s. Everything from the weather, to the food, to the strong Latino culture was intoxicating to me. I would try to visit my grandparents as often as humanly possible while they were still with us. Sometimes twice or three times a year. On occasion, I would even convince my parents to let me fly down alone so I could spend time with them. It’s not something many people know about me but Miami is very much my second home and has always held a special place in my heart. In fact, my wife and I have made the decision to spend a few months down south starting next week!

Ding's Coleslaw Houston's Hillstone Copycat recipe Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30

On a recent trip to Miami, I didn’t miss the opportunity to indulge at my favourite restaurant. This time, though, I paid careful attention to Ding’s Coleslaw, which, for whatever reason, tasted even better than usual. In all my years of dining at Houston’s (nearly 20 years now, I think), I never once stopped to notice that the coleslaw had pickles in it! MIND BLOWN!

I also noticed an obscene amount of scallions, lots of fresh parsley and a rich and creamy mayo-based dressing, which definitely had some refined sugar in it. I knew I wanted to recreate a version of it as soon as I got home and that’s exactly what I did.

Since I’m doing the January Whole30 at the moment, I decided to omit the sweetener altogether. The coleslaw still came out delicious without it but if you want to make a paleo-friendly dressing that’s closer to the original Ding’s Coleslaw, try adding 1 tablespoon of honey or agave sweetener.

Copycat Ding's Coleslaw – Whole30, Paleo

An easy and healthy copycat version of the famous Ding's Coleslaw from Houston's and Hillstone Restaurants. So good you'll be eating it with ALL THE THINGS!

  • 1 cup whole30-compliant mayonnaise
  • 1.5 tablespoon whole30-compliant Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish
  • 1 teaspoon granulated onion
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • kosher salt to taste
  • 1 small head of cabbage – around 2.5 pounds (thinly shredded)
  • 10 scallions – thinly sliced
  • ½ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • ¼ cup finely chopped dill pickle
  1. In a large bowl, combine the mayonnaise, mustard, vinegar, horseradish, granulated onion and black pepper. Whisk the dressing to combine.
  2. Add the cabbage, scallions, parsley and pickles. Toss everything to coat, cover and refrigerate 1 hour. Taste the coleslaw for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. Coleslaw can be made 4 to 5 days in advance.

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Roast Beef Hash – Whole30, Paleoish https://cookprimalgourmet.com/roast-beef-hash-whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/roast-beef-hash-whole30#respond Wed, 01 Jan 2020 22:43:35 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5352

This Roast Beef Hash makes the most out of your leftovers. It's quick, easy, filling and the hash can be made in advance for breakfast in a flash.

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Happy New Year! It’s January 1st and today marks the first day of my January Whole30! That means two things: new NSVs (non-scale victories) and ALL THE EGGS! Ha Ha! Let’s just say that this Roast Beef Hash is the first instalment in a month long journey of supporting Canadian egg farmers.

Whole30 Leftover Roast Beef Hash Pale Primal Gourmet Easy Breakfast Recipe

I’ll be honest, things got off to a slow start for me this morning. I woke up much later than usual and because we feasted until late last night, I didn’t have much of an appetite. To be fair, I rarely wake up with an appetite but during a round of Whole30, I do my best to get in a full breakfast, as the program recommends. So, rather than force feed myself, I listened to my body, had a couple cups of black coffee and caught up on some work until dinner time, which was earlier than usual. Call it an accidental intermittent fast.

The good news is that I planned ahead yesterday and made my Herb Crusted Prime Rib for New Year’s Eve dinner. With it came some delicious leftovers! Not only was dinner a huge hit with my family last night, but now I have the foundation for some amazing Roast Beef Hash for the next couple of days. It’s just one less thing for me to think about as I begin my Whole30.

Whole30 Leftover Roast Beef Hash Pale Primal Gourmet Easy Breakfast Recipe

You can use just about any leftover roast beef here. In fact, you can use leftover roast lamb as well. Heck, if you have some leftover steak, that will work as well! The point is, this roast beef hash is ideal for using up whatever you have in your fridge, especially if you have some corned beef lying around.

Because of my slow start this morning, I decided that breakfast for dinner was in order and boy, oh boy, did this roast beef hash hit the spot. To make my life even easier, I used up a leftover baked potato. This saved me a bit of time, but if you only have raw potatoes or sweet potatoes, those will work too. Just be sure to cook the raw potatoes first, before the veggies, because they need more time to soften.

Whole30 Leftover Roast Beef Hash Pale Primal Gourmet Easy Breakfast Recipe

If you are someone that is either allergic to eggs, or can’t have them at the moment for whatever reason, then you can absolutely omit them here. I wouldn’t say there is a replacement for them, but instead you can just add additional veggies and meat to fill you up. You can also enjoy this breakfast hash with a side of greens or a salad.

Roast Beef Hash – Whole30, Paleoish

This Roast Beef Hash makes the most out of your leftovers. It's quick, easy, filling and the hash can be made in advance for breakfast in a flash.

  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • ½ red bell pepper (diced)
  • ½ medium red onion (diced)
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 leftover baked potato (diced)
  • 2 cups leftover roast beef or lamb (diced)
  • 4 to 6 eggs
  • ½ avocado (diced)
  • Compliant hot sauce of choice (such as Cholula or Siete, for serving)
  1. Preheat a non-stick or cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add ghee and heat until melted. Add peppers and onion and season with a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft and translucent, about 3 minutes.
  2. Add potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are warmed through, about 3 minutes.
  3. Add beef and cook, stirring occasionally, until warmed through, about 3 minutes. If using a smaller pan, set half of the hash mixture aside at this point to make some room for the eggs. You can then return the hash to the skillet after the eggs have cooked.
  4. Crack each egg individually into a ramekin. Using a spoon or spatula, create a well in the hash and carefully pour the egg into the empty space in the pan. Repeat with each egg.
  5. Lower the heat to medium and cook until the eggs have reached your desired doneness. Transfer hash to a serving plate, garnish with avocado and enjoy with hot sauce of choice.

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13 Gift Ideas for the Home Cook | 2019 Gift Guide https://cookprimalgourmet.com/2019-gift-guide-home-cook https://cookprimalgourmet.com/2019-gift-guide-home-cook#respond Fri, 20 Dec 2019 18:20:01 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5308

Looking for something special for the home cook in your life? These gift ideas are a great place to shop for even the pickiest of foodies!

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As in years past, I’ve put together a small list of gift ideas for the home cook. Whether you’re shopping for your son or daughter headed off to college, or a friend who fancies themselves the biggest foodie in the world, this holiday gift guide is a great place to find inspiration for that food lover in your life.

13 Gift Ideas for the Home Cook 2019 Gift Guide Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet

Shopping after the holiday season? Even better! Some of these items might go on heavy discount come Boxing Day so be sure to check back if you’ve already finished playing Santa for your friends and family.

Each item in this gift guide has been carefully and thoughtfully hand-picked by yours truly. Those who know me, know that I take my recommendations very seriously. Everything listed here is either something I personally own or covet.

Either way, you can’t go wrong with one of these gifts in your virtual shopping cart. Speaking of, each of these items is available on Amazon, which is great for anyone that can’t find the time or patience to deal with holiday shopping in stores. It’s also great for last-minute shoppers looking for a fast shipping time through an Amazon Prime membership.

 

13 Gift Ideas for the Home Cook 2019 Gift Guide Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet

  1. Victorinox Fibrox 8” Chef’s Knife

  2. Hario V60 Electric Gooseneck Kettle

  3. OXO Salad Spinner

  4. The Defined Dish Cookbook

  5. Philips Smoke-Less Indoor Grill

  6. Truff Hot Sauce

  7. OXO Sprializer

  8. Ooni Portable Pizza Oven

  9. Peugeot Pepper Mill

  10. Victorinox Fibrox Knife Block

  11. Swissmar Trio Peeler Set

  12. Amazon Basics Digital Scale

  13. Chef’s Choice EdgeSelect Electric Knife Sharpener

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Chicken Stroganoff – Paleo, Whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/chicken-stroganoff-whole30-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/chicken-stroganoff-whole30-paleo#comments Mon, 09 Dec 2019 16:28:55 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5286

You’ll never believe this Chicken Stroganoff is dairy free! It’s rich, creamy, delicious and comes together in no time at all. Did I mention it’s Whole30?

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If you loved my Beef Stroganoff, you’re going to really enjoy this Chicken Stroganoff. It’s just as easy to prepare, virtually dairy-free, and super rich and creamy. In fact, I’ve even made it easier to prepare! The entire dish comes together in just 30 minutes and is excellent when served overtop of some mashed potatoes or homemade French fries. You can even pair it with some cauliflower purée for a low-carb dinner.

Chicken Stroganoff Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe Gluten Free

Beef Stroganoff, the classic Russian delicacy, is far more common than any chicken version. But I don’t think that should stop anyone from trying this delicious sauce with white meat. I’d even go so far as to say that you can substitute pork cutlets or even some ground meat (chicken, beef or pork).

A classic stroganoff sauce is most often made with sour cream and just about everyone has their own spin on it. As with everything else he cooks, my father’s spin is extra garlic, lots of fresh dill and serving it over homemade french fries. It was always a treat when he made us stroganoff growing up, although he never once did it with chicken.

Here, I riff on his version but make things a bit lighter and healthier. It’s Whole30 compliant and Paleo friendly, which is an easier way of saying it’s free of grains, gluten, refined sugar, legumes and alcohol and virtually free of dairy since I use ghee. So, feel free to use it in your January Whole30 or fit it into your food freedom as you see fit.

Chicken Stroganoff Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe Gluten Free

As with my Beef Stroganoff, I replace the traditional sour cream with coconut milk and a bit of lemon juice. However, I don’t go through the step of making a coconut sour cream here. Instead, I decided to try simplifying things and making them easier. Happy to say that things worked out!

The coconut milk gets reduced down with mustard and cooks with the onions and garlic, which helps to mellow out the flavours. Then, to reconstitute and loosen the sauce, I add the chicken stock. Adding fresh dill at the end also helps mask any coconut flavour. The result is a sauce that is rich, creamy and super delicious but doesn’t taste like coconut.

Chicken Stroganoff – Paleo, Whole30

You’ll never believe this Chicken Stroganoff is dairy free! It’s rich, creamy, delicious and comes together in no time at all. Did I mention it’s Whole30?

  • 2 chicken breasts (sliced in half lengthwise)
  • Kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 2  tbsp  avocado oil
  • 8 ounces cremini mushrooms – thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ghee
  • 1/4  small red onion (thinly sliced)
  • 3  cloves  garlic – thinly sliced
  • 1  cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1  tbsp Dijon or whole-grain mustard
  • 1  cup  chicken stock
  • 2  tbsp finely chopped fresh dill ( plus extra for garnish)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  1. Instructions
  2. Lightly season both sides of each chicken breast with salt and pepper
  3. Preheat a 12” stainless-steel or cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add avocado oil and heat until shimmering. Cook the chicken, undisturbed, until golden brown, around 4 minutes. Flip and cook an additional 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown on the second side. Transfer the chicken to a serving platter and set aside. You can tent it with foil to keep it warm.
  4. Return the pan to the stovetop and lower the heat to medium. Add the mushrooms and ghee and season with a pinch of salt. Cook the mushrooms, stirring and scraping any brown bits on the bottom of the pan, until softened, 4 to 5 minutes.
  5. Once the mushrooms have browned and their moisture has evaporated, add the onions and cook, stirring, until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, 1 minute.
  6. Add coconut milk and mustard, bring to a simmer and cook, stirring regularly, until reduced by half in volume. Add the chicken stock, bring to a simmer and cook, stirring regularly, until reduced by half in volume.
  7. Remove from heat, add dill and lemon juice and season with black pepper to taste. Stir to combine, taste the sauce for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired.
  8. Spoon the hot stroganoff sauce overtop of the chicken and serve immediately.

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Coconut Shrimp Salad with Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette https://cookprimalgourmet.com/coconut-shrimp-salad-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/coconut-shrimp-salad-paleo#respond Sat, 07 Dec 2019 17:30:36 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5276

Crispy, crunchy, juicy Coconut Shrimp with only two ingredients? It's true! Try serving them over a crunchy salad with a homemade sesame-ginger vinaigrette.

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Crispy, crunchy, juicy Coconut Shrimp with only two ingredients? Take all my money! OK, maybe not ALL my money because I need a couple of bucks to make the salad and sesame-ginger vinaigrette to serve the shrimp over.

I don’t know about you but I’ve long loved the combination of coconut and shrimp. Each is great individually, but put them together and I get really excited. The subtle sweetness from the coconut pairs really nicely with the delicate flavour of the shrimp. When gently fried until golden brown, the coconut gets crispy and develops a nutty flavour that takes things to the next level. Then again, I know there are more than a few of you who can’t stand the sight of either coconut or shrimp, so maybe skip this recipe altogether if that’s the case?

Coconut Shrimp Salad Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Most recipes for coconut shrimp involve dredging the shrimp in flour before coating it in a flour-based batter. The battered shrimp are then dipped in coconut and deep-fried in a neutral-flavoured oil with a high-smoking point, such as canola or peanut. There’s no denying that this process results in a supremely crispy, juicy and delicious finished product. Alas, it’s not exactly healthy.

It can, however, be made healthyish through a few clever paleo substitutions. That’s a story for another time (same place though – this blog) because as of late, time has been of the essence for me and I’ve found myself looking for more and more shortcuts in the kitchen. I thought to myself, I wonder if I could just coat the shrimp in some shredded coconut and call it a day. Turns out, I can and so can you!

The coconut doesn’t stick “perfectly” to the shrimp as it gets shallow-fried in a skillet and some of the shreds will inevitably fall off. But, with a firm pressing of the hands, enough of the coconut clings on to give you a nice crust on the shrimp. And, almost like a consolation prize, any of the coconut shreds that do fall off, get toasted in the oil and can be used as a garnish for the salad or anything else you want to serve the coconut shrimp with. So, be sure to keep any of those golden brown bits for later as you fry the shrimp.

Coconut Shrimp Salad Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Speaking of frying, I like to use coconut oil here. It has a high smoking point, but that isn’t all too important since you’re only cooking the shrimp at medium heat. The real reason I like it is because the flavour echoes the shredded coconut. If you don’t have coconut oil, you can substitute avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil. Keep in mind that the former is neutral in flavour and colour and the latter will impart a bit of flavour and colour.

The salad I serve the coconut shrimp with is an Asian-inspired one. You know those premade packages of salad you can find at the grocery store? Think of this as a homemade version that costs way less and tastes better.

Same goes for the Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette, which is super easy to throw together and much healthier than anything store-bought. The secret ingredient? A bit of tahini paste (100% pure toasted sesame seed paste), which adds an extra pop of sesame flavour and acts as an emulsifier.

Coconut Shrimp Salad Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Coconut Shrimp Salad with Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette

Crispy, crunchy, juicy Coconut Shrimp with only two ingredients? It's true! Try serving them over a crunchy salad with a homemade sesame-ginger vinaigrette.

For the Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette:

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/8 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 1/8 cup coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon pure toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon 100% pure tahini paste
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon pure (organic maple syrup)
  • 1 clove garlic (finely chopped)
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt

For the Coconut Shrimp:

  • 17- ounces 16/20 jumbo shrimp (peeled and deveined, tails left intact)
  • ½ cup shredded desiccated coconut
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil (plus more if needed)

For the Salad:

  • 2 heads romaine lettuce (roughly chopped into 1-inch ribbons)
  • 2 scallions (thinly sliced)
  • 2 mandarin oranges (segmented)
  • 1 cup thinly sliced purple cabbage
  • 1 carrot (julienned)
  • 1/3 cup toasted (unsalted cashews)
  • ½ red bell pepper (julienned)

For the Sesame-Ginger Vinaigrette:

  1. Add all of the ingredients to a medium bowl and whisk until emulsified. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve, or up to 1 week.

For the Salad:

  1. In a large bowl, toss together all of the ingredients.

For the Coconut Shrimp:

  1. In a shallow bowl or plate, add the shredded coconut. Season with salt and pepper and stir through to incorporate.
  2. Rinse and pat shrimp very dry with paper towel. Coat both sides of each shrimp in the seasoned coconut. Be sure to press down firmly so that the coating sticks.
  3. Add coconut oil to a non-stick skillet and place over medium heat. Test the heat of the oil by adding a couple of loose shreds of coconut. If they sizzle, you know your oil is hot enough.
  4. Working in batches so as not to overcrowd the pan, cook the shrimp until golden brown on both sides, around 3 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked shrimp to a wire rack set over a rimmed sheet pan while you continue to cook the remaining shrimp. If cooking a large batch, you can keep the cooked shrimp warm in a 200F oven.
  5. Transfer any of the loose shreds of toasted coconut in the pan to a bowl lined with paper towel.

To serve:

  1. Add the tossed salad to individual serving bowls. Drizzle with the vinaigrette and top with the coconut shrimp. Garnish with a sprinkling of toasted coconut and enjoy immediately.

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Smoked Chicken Wings – Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-chicken-wings-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-chicken-wings-paleo#comments Fri, 06 Dec 2019 00:03:08 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5260

These Smoked Chicken Wings are sweet, spicy, crispy and loaded with wood-fired flavour. Try serving with homemade Alabama White BBQ Sauce for dipping.

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I cooked up 4 pounds of smoked chicken wings last night on my Traeger but didn’t get a chance to snap a photo before the sun went down at 5pm. So, today, I did what any reasonable human being would do and cooked another 4 pounds. I also made another batch of Alabama White BBQ sauce for dipping, because consistency is key.

Smoked Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Traeger Recipes

If you’ve never tried smoked chicken wings, you’re seriously missing out. They’ve got to be my absolute favourite way to cook wings. They also happen to be one of the easiest. You get amazing, wood-fired flavour from the Traeger, and thanks to an easy homemade spice rub, the wings are sweet, spicy and incredibly delicious.

The wings themselves are Paleo friendly. I use coconut sugar in the spice rub instead of the more traditional brown sugar found in most store-bought varieties. You get a similar sweet and sticky finish on the wings without the spike in your blood sugar.

While the smoked chicken wings cooked, I threw together a super easy and delicious Alabama White BBQ Sauce. The sauce is actually Whole30 compliant and goes great with roasted chicken as well. It’s creamy and has a lot of twang from the apple cider vinegar and prepared horseradish, which are the perfect balance for the sweet coconut sugar in the spice rub. This stuff is addictive so I recommend making a double batch.

I’m often asked to share tips and tricks for cooking on a Traeger so here are two steps I take to get

the best smoked chicken wings:

Smoked Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Traeger Recipes

Use a Binder:

Rubbing the wings in a bit of hot sauce not only imparts a bit of flavour, but it also works as a binder that will help the spice rub to stick to the wings. Mustard is another common binder amongst the barbecue community.

You can probably get away without using a binder on the wings, but keep in mind that smoke is water soluble so the moisture in the hot sauce will also help absorb some of the smokey flavour from the grill.

Smoke First, Grill Later:

I like to start off by cooking my wings at 165F for 30 minutes. This gives the wings a good amount of smoke flavour without cooking them through. I’ve also tried this step at 225F, but find that you don’t get quite the same amount of smoke flavour at the higher heat. Then, to finish cooking the smoked chicken wings and get the skin nice and crispy, I crank the heat up to 425F for another 30 to 35 minutes or until they’re around 175F internally.

 

See here for Alabama White BBQ Sauce recipe

Smoked Chicken Wings – Paleo

These Smoked Chicken Wings are sweet, spicy, crispy and loaded with wood-fired flavour. Try serving with homemade Alabama White BBQ Sauce for dipping.

  • 2  tbsp  coconut sugar
  • 1  tbsp  onion powder
  • 1  tbsp  garlic powder
  • 1  tbsp  paprika
  • 2  tsp  kosher salt
  • 1  tsp  cayenne pepper
  • 4 pounds free-range ( organic split, chicken wings)
  • 1 tablespoon hot sauce of choice – I used Cholula original
  • 1 <wprm-code>recipe Alabama White BBQ Sauce</wprm-code>
  1. Run the start-up cycle on your Traeger and preheat the grill to 165F.
  2. In a bowl, combine the coconut sugar, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, salt and cayenne pepper. Stir until combined and set aside.
  3. Pat the wings dry with paper towel and add them to a large bowl. Pour in the hot sauce and toss the wings to coat. Lay the wings out in a single layer on a large sheet pan. Liberally and evenly season both sides of the chicken wings. If there is leftover spice rub, place in a sealable jar and store at room temperature for up to 30 days.
  4. Transfer the wings directly onto the preheated grill. Close the lid and smoke at 225F for 30 min.
  5. Raise the heat to 425F and cook the wings until deeply browned and crispy, or until 175F internally.
  6. Transfer the smoked chicken wings to a serving platter and serve with the Alabama White BBQ sauce.

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/pot-pie-soup-whole30-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/pot-pie-soup-whole30-paleo#comments Fri, 29 Nov 2019 22:26:18 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5246

Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up Thanksgiving Day leftovers. It's everything you love about pot pie, but as a soup!

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up some of those Thanksgiving leftovers. It’s everything you love about a pot pie (rich, creamy, and loaded with goodness) but in the form of a soup, which saves you the cumbersome step of making a pie crust and usually ends up feeding more people.

Turkey Chicken Pot Pie Soup Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe

Don’t get me wrong, a turkey pot pie is an equally delicious way to use Thanksgiving leftovers and if that’s the path you want to take, I won’t stand in your way. In fact, I’ll even point you in the direction of this insanely delicious paleo and gluten-free Pot Pie complete with a homemade pie crust.

My guess, though, is that you’re all pie’d out from the Thanksgiving Day feast and the last thing you want to do is spend any more time in the kitchen than is absolutely necessary. Enter: Pot Pie Soup.

I should also mention that the soup is just as good with leftover roasted chicken if that’s what you have on hand. You can also feel free to use any type of vegetable you want. Chopped green beans make for a great substitute for the more traditional peas. Diced potatoes are also a very welcome addition and make the soup much heartier and chunky – both good things!

Turkey Chicken Pot Pie Soup Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe

To make things even easier than they already are, I like to use frozen vegetables. It skips the step of having to rinse and chop the vegetables. Here, I went for a mix of frozen cauliflower and broccoli, which keeps things paleo and whole30. Just keep in mind that the flavours tend to be a bit subtler when using frozen vegetables.

I hope those that celebrated Thanksgiving yesterday had a great day full of delicious food and lots of laughter!

Turkey Pot Pie Soup – Whole30, Paleo

Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up Thanksgiving Day leftovers. It's everything you love about pot pie, but as a soup!

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium carrots (peeled and diced)
  • 1 celery stalk (diced)
  • 1 yellow onion (diced)
  • Kosher salt
  • 3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 2 quarts chicken or turkey stock
  • 1 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (roughly chopped)
  • 3 cups leftover roasted turkey or chicken (cubed)
  • 2 cups frozen or fresh mixed vegetables (such as cauliflower, and broccoli)
  • Freshly-cracked black pepper
  1. Preheat a stockpot over medium-high heat. Add olive oil and heat until glistening. Add carrot, celery, and onion. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until the onions are soft and translucent. Add garlic and cook 60 seconds.
  2. Add arrowroot starch and cook, stirring, until no longer clumpy, around 2 minutes. Add the chicken or turkey stock and stir to incorporate. Add the coconut milk and bring to a simmer.

  3. Add the thyme and vegetables and stir to combine. Stir in the turkey or chicken and bring everything to a simmer. Cook the soup, uncovered, until the vegetables have softened and the flavours have come together, around 30 minutes. Taste the soup for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. Ladle into individual bowls and serve immediately.

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Turkey Gravy – Gluten-Free, Paleo, Whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/turkey-gravy-gluten-free-paleo-whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/turkey-gravy-gluten-free-paleo-whole30#comments Thu, 28 Nov 2019 17:44:02 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5237

A Turkey Gravy so rich, delicious and satisfying that you would never believe it's gluten-free, paleo and Whole30. It's a must at Thanksgiving of Christmas!

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A Turkey Gravy so rich, delicious and satisfying that you would never believe it’s gluten-free, paleo and Whole30. It’s a must at Thanksgiving or Christmas!

You can most definitely use a homemade turkey stock here. In fact, it’s ideal in terms of flavour and reducing waste. But in the off chance that you just couldn’t find the time, using a packaged turkey bone broth, like the one from organic one from Thrive Market, is a lifesaver. It’s super healthy, made from all-natural ingredients, free of sugars or junky fillers, and tastes really great when transformed into a turkey gravy.

Here, I’m sharing a gravy that is every bit as good as the one your granny made from scratch. It also just so happens to be gluten-free, paleo and Whole30 compliant thanks to the ghee and arrowroot starch.

This grain-free, natural thickener works similar to corn starch and is perfect for making a roux, a thickener that usually consists of frying equal parts fat with flour. Unlike regular flour though, arrowroot starch doesn’t need to be toasted for too long because it’s neutral in flavour.

Can This Turkey Gravy Be Made Ahead of Time?

Seeing as how I’m publishing this recipe on Thanksgiving Day (sorry, I was getting over a cold), this answer probably won’t help you much right now. But in the chance that you wan’t to prepare it in the future or for Christmas, I can tell you that the gravy can be made up to one day in advance.

If making the gravy ahead of time, I recommend reducing it halfway at first. Then, when reheating, continue to reduce it to your desired consistency. This way, you don’t run the risk of having it become to thick when reheating it before serving.

Turkey Gravy Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Gluten-Free Recipe

Turkey Gravy – Gluten-Free, Paleo, Whole30

A Turkey Gravy so rich, delicious and satisfying that you would never believe it's gluten-free, paleo and Whole30. It's a must at Thanksgiving or Christmas!

  • 2 tablespoons ghee or grass-fed butter
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 16.9 fl ounce Thrive Market Organic Turkey Bone Broth
  • roast turkey pan drippings (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt (plus more to taste)
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper (plus more to taste)
  1. Pour bone broth into a sauce pan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat.
  2. Meanwhile, add ghee or butter to a separate sauce pan over medium heat. Once the butter has melted, sprinkle in the arrowroot starch and whisk until smooth and no longer clumpy to form a roux, about 2 minutes.
  3. Whisking continuously, slowly pour the hot bone broth into the roux ¼ cup at a time. It’s important to do this gradually to avoid clumps in your gravy. If using pan drippings, add them now. Once fully incorporated and smooth, season the gravy with salt and pepper.

  4. Bring the gravy to a gentle simmer over medium heat and cook, whisking occasionally, until reduced in volume by two-thirds or more depending on how thick you like it. Taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired.
  5. Transfer the gravy to a gravy boat and serve immediately.

This gravy can be made up to one day in advance. If making the gravy ahead of time, I recommend reducing it halfway at first. Then, when reheating, continue to reduce it to your desired consistency. This way, you don’t run the risk of having it become to thick when reheating it before serving.

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Smoked Turkey Recipe – Paleo, Whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-turkey-recipe-paleo-whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-turkey-recipe-paleo-whole30#comments Thu, 21 Nov 2019 23:30:30 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5220

Smoked Turkey isn't just an incredibly delicious way to prepare Thanksgiving Dinner, it also might be the easist. Try this method and be sure to dry brine!

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Smoked Turkey is actually the only way I like my turkey and for the past three years it has been my go-to method when it comes to celebrating Thanksgiving. I love the smokey flavours, it’s extremely easy to do on my Traeger Grill, and the turkey always comes out so incredibly juicy. To maximize the flavour of my turkey, I always do two things: I brine the bird and I smother it with a compound “butter” (I normally use ghee), made with lots of fresh herbs.

Smoked Turkey Recipe Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Thanksgiving Day Easy

No matter how you decide to cook your Thanksgiving turkey, you should absolutely brine it. This shouldn’t even be a point of discussion. Brine your turkeys, end of story. It results in a far less dry finished product and makes the turkey much more flavourful.

You can do this two ways: go with a regular brine, which is essentially a salt water solution, or use a dry brine, which basically means you salt the turkey for an extended period of time and leave it uncovered in the fridge. Wet brines and dry brines each have their pros and cons. I tend to prefer dry brines for a few reasons, which I’ll briefly explain below.

Why You Should Brine: Smoked Turkey or Otherwise

Because I am very much a simpleton when it comes to science, I really like Alton Brown’s explanation for why you should brine your turkey. In an nutshell, you can think of brining like taking out an insurance policy that will prevent your turkey from drying out. Through a process of osmosis (which I won’t pretend to actually know anything about), moisture in the bird is pulled out into the brine and then pushed back in.

The end result is a much more moist finished product because (if I understand this correctly, which I probably don’t) you are essentially hydrating the muscular tissue of the turkey. So, as the turkey cooks and inevitably releases moisture, it doesn’t dry out. At the same time, you’re also seasoning the deeper parts of the flesh with the salt in the brine. Moreover, if you are adding herbs, spices and aromatics to your brine, those flavours are also going to marinade the turkey.

Smoked Turkey Recipe Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Thanksgiving Day Easy

Wet Brines vs. Dry Brines

Wet brines are great for the above reasons, but for an 18 to 20-pound turkey you’re going to need two things: a big enough food-safe bucket to fully submerge the turkey in its brine, and somewhere to keep it cold until it’s ready to cook (usually 24 hours later.) Most refrigerators, especially ones that are full with other foods necessary for Thanksgiving, won’t accommodate the space needed for such a big bucket. Let alone tiny apartment fridges like the one I had for a year while living in a condo.

It is possible to brine a turkey in a large cooler, but to do this you’ll need to keep a watchful eye on the temperature of the brine, adjusting it with ice every so often to ensure it does not drop below a food-safe temperature. This tends to be quite a bit of work and can get messy when trying to discard the water after brining.

Dry brines, as the name suggests, do not involve any liquid. Instead, it simply means that the turkey (or any other protein your using) is salted for an extended period of time. Like a wet brine, you can incorporate different herbs, spices and flavourings into your dry brine to a similar effect. The salt on the surface of the turkey will pull moisture out from the bird and then push it back in through a process osmosis. Like a wet brine, a dry brine keeps the turkey moist and prevents it from drying out, and it also seasons the meat more deeply and evenly.

The downside is it doesn’t necessarily do as good of a job as a wet brine because you are relying solely on the available moisture already present in the turkey. Nevertheless, I can tell you from personal experience that a dry brined turkey is really, really delicious. Especially when you’re going for smoked turkey. So, even if you can’t accommodate a wet brine, you should absolutely dry brine your turkey.

Smoked vs Roasted Turkey?

The answer here is a simple one for me: smoked. All the way. Smoking doesn’t just impart flavour, I find it to deliver a much juicier finished product.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, there is no better product on the market than a Traeger Grill when it comes to smoking. Not only does it deliver incredible wood-fired flavour, it is the easiest grill I’ve ever operated. Let me put it to you this way, if you know how to use an oven, you can master a Traeger.

I’ll have to do a more in-depth article on it, but in a nutshell a Traeger works just like a convection oven in that it uses indirect heat and circulated air to cook food. The difference is that Traeger operate on a combination of electric power and 100% all-natural, food grade pellets that deliver an incredible wood-fired flavour.

Smoked Turkey Recipe Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Thanksgiving Day Easy

Smoked Turkey and Compound Butter Go Together Like Peanut Butter and Jelly

I think I picked up this trick from a Tyler Florence recipe years ago. To be honest, I can’t remember. But it involves using your hand to create a pocket between the skin of the turkey and the breast meat. This then allows you to stuff the pocket with a compound butter made with plenty of fresh herbs, like rosemary, sage, thyme and parsley.

As the turkey cooks, the compound butter melts down and flavours the breast meat, which is the most likely part of the meat to dry out. Just like the brine, this compound butter acts as a kind of insurance policy to prevent the turkey from becoming dry.

To Spatchcock or Not to Spatchcock?

Here again, my answer is simple: spatchcock, without a doubt. Spatchcocking, meaning to butterfly the bird and remove the backbone, does three things: it allows the bird to cook more evenly, it decreases the amount of time it takes to cook the bird, and it exposes more of the skin, which can then get more crispy as it cooks. Not to mention the fact that it’s actually much easier to carve a spatchcocked turkey than one that is cooke whole.

I also like to spatchcock my turkey because, as mentioned, I usually dry brine my bird so I need to be able to refrigerate it. Butterflying the turkey and laying it flat makes it much easier to do so.

For all of these reasons, you should spatchcock your turkey, smoked or otherwise.

Smoked Turkey Recipe – Paleo, Whole30

Smoked Turkey isn't just an incredibly delicious way to prepare Thanksgiving Dinner, it also might be the easist. Try this method and be sure to dry brine!

  • 1 18 to 20- pound turkey (preferably free-range, organic and humanely raised)
  • 2.5 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1.5 teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • ¾ cup room temperature ghee or grass-fed butter
  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh (rosemary plus extra for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh (thyme plus extra for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh (sage, plus extra for garnish)
  1. Using a sharp knife or pair of kitchen shears, remove the backbone of the turkey and refrigerate it to make homemade turkey stock later. With the turkey breast side-down, make an incision in the back of the breast bone. Flip the turkey so that it is breast side-up and press down on the breasts to flatten it. Being careful not to pierce the skin, use your hands to separate the skin from the breast, creating a pocket of air. Pat the turkey very dry with paper towel.

  2. Combine the salt and pepper in a small bowl. Season the bird generously all over with the salt and pepper.

  3. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a wire rack. Lay the turkey flat on the wire rack, breast side-up, and refrigerate, uncovered, for 24 hours.
  4. Remove the turkey from the fridge 1 hour before cooking to let it come to room temperature. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the ghee, parsley, rosemary, thyme, and sage. Mix until incorporated.
  5. The turkey should be dry at this point but if there is any surface moisture, pat it dry with a paper towel. Using your hands, stuff the pocket between the breast meat and skin with the compound butter.
  6. Set the Traeger to 225F and preheat with the lid closed for 15 minutes.

  7. Set the wire rack over a 4-inch-deep roasting dish and set the turkey on top, breast side-up. Close the lid and smoke the turkey until the thickest part of the breast reaches an internal temperature of 100 to 110F, 2 to 2.5 hours. Take into account temperature fluctuations due to ambient weather.

  8. Raise the temperature to 375F and cook the turkey, basting it with any rendered juices twice or three times, until the thickest part of the breast reaches 160F, 1 to 1.5 hours. Transfer the cooked turkey to a carving board and loosely tent with foil. Let the turkey rest for at least 20 minutes before carving.

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Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash https://cookprimalgourmet.com/sweet-sour-roasted-squash https://cookprimalgourmet.com/sweet-sour-roasted-squash#comments Tue, 19 Nov 2019 23:46:20 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5208

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash may not be the first thing you think of when it comes to Thanksgiving Day side dishes, but trust me, it works!

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Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash is an incredibly easy side dish that is as beautiful as it is delicious. As the name suggests, it’s sweet, sour and even a little bit spicy thanks to the addition of some Aleppo pepper. To finish the dish, I like to add some toasted pecans for some added crunch. The play of flavours and textures is incredible.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes To Make

The play of sweet and sour comes from an easy agrodolce sauce. Sounds fancy, but it’s really just a combination of sugar and vinegar. To keep things Paleo, I like to use a natural sweetener, such as pure maple syrup or honey. The taste is incredible so I see no reason to not use a healthier option here. It’s also very versatile and makes an amazing glaze for grilled meats, like these pork chops.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes To Make

There are two important tips when it comes to making delicious roasted squash. The first is to space them out on the baking sheet with one of the cut sides. Giving them enough room to “breathe” will result in a deeper caramelization, which is a good thing. Placing them with one of the cut sides down allows for contact to be made with the baking sheet, which actually helps brown the squash.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes To Make

The other tip is to cook the squash undisturbed. Most recipes call for flipping squash halfway. So, for example, if you cook the squash for 50 minutes total, you’re asked to flip at the 25 minute mark. I actually find this to result in a less caramelized, and less delicious, roasted squash. Instead, I let the squash roast for 40 minutes before flipping it and glazing it with the agrodolce sauce. This way, the squash has enough time to develop a deep and delicious crust on at least one side.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash may not be the first thing you think of when it comes to Thanksgiving Day side dishes, but trust me, it works!

  • 1 acorn squash (seeded and cut into 2-inch-thick wedges)
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 1/4  cup  white wine vinegar
  • 1/4  cup  maple syrup
  • 1/4  cup  Extra Virgin olive oil EVOO
  • 6 springs fresh thyme (tied together with butcher’s twine)
  • 2  cloves  garlic – smashed
  • ½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper flakes
  • ¼ cup unsalted pecans (toasted and roughly chopped)
  1. Preheat the oven to 400F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl, combine the squash, avocado oil, salt and pepper and toss to coat. Arrange the squash on the prepared baking sheet in a single layer, cut side-down. Do not overcrowd the pan.
  3. Roast the squash for 40 minutes, undisturbed, or until the bottom of each wedge is golden brown and the centers can easily be pierced with a fork.
  4. Meanwhile, add the vinegar, maple syrup, olive oil, garlic and thyme to a cold, 2-quart sauce pan. Set the pan over medium-low heat and gently cook the sauce, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced in volume by 1/4, approximately 12 minutes. Discard the garlic and thyme and set the sauce aside.
  5. Flip the squash wedges, drizzle with ¼ of the sauce and return it to the oven to allow the sauce to caramelize, 8 to 10 minutes.
  6. Arrange the squash on a serving platter. Drizzle with the remaining sauce and season with the Aleppo pepper. Garnish with the pecans and serve immediately.

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