Primal Gourmet http://cookprimalgourmet.com Paleo and Whole30 Recipes Tips and Kitchen Tricks Thu, 22 Aug 2019 22:25:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 Popcorn Shrimp with Cocktail Sauce – Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/popcorn-shrimp-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/popcorn-shrimp-paleo#respond Thu, 22 Aug 2019 22:25:37 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4779

Crispy, grain-free, gluten-free Popcorn Shrimp lightly fried to perfection and served with a Whole30 compliant cocktail sauce! It's what dreams are made of!

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If you loved my Popcorn Chicken, you’re going to flip for this Popcorn Shrimp!

Crispy, golden-brown, delicious shrimp get coated in arrowroot starch, dipped in an egg wash and dredged in cassava flour before being shallow fried to perfection in some coconut oil. I pair the shrimp with a super easy yet incredibly delicious Whole30 compliant cocktail sauce. The combination is a match made in heaven!

Paleo Popcorn Shrimp Whole30 Cocktail Sauce Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Though the popcorn shrimp are grain-free, gluten-free, Paleo and technically made with Whole30 compliant ingredients, I would file this one under SWYPO, making it off limits during your round. SWYPO (sex with your pants on) refers to paleofied junk foods. It’s good, but not as good as the real thing. These fried shrimp kind of fall under that category, except I actually think they taste better this way! So, it might be best to leave these popcorn shrimp to life after Whole30 (or before!).

The cocktail sauce, however, is Paleo and Whole30 compliant and an amazing dipping sauce for the popcorn shrimp. It’s as simple as stirring together some sugar-free, compliant ketchup, prepared horseradish, lemon juice and coconut aminos. The sauce is tangy, rich, and super tasty! Try using it for other shrimp dishes during your round of Whole30.

Paleo Popcorn Shrimp Whole30 Cocktail Sauce Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

When it comes to Popcorn Shrimp, Size Matters

Although the “popcorn” in the recipe title implies bite-sized morsels of crispy shrimp, I prefer to use an extra-large or jumbo shrimp (26/30 or 16/20) for this recipe.

Cassava flour takes a bit longer to get brown and crispy than traditional flour so using a larger shrimp will allow you to develop a nice colour on the outside without overcooking the inside. If you use a small or extra small shrimp, you will likely overcook the inside, making it tough and rubbery, before the exterior has had a chance to properly cook.

Golden Rules for Frying with Alternative Flours

Be sure to only dredge the shrimp immediately before frying. Alternative flours like arrowroot starch and cassava flour tend to get gummy after they come into contact with moisture. Working in batches will help prevent the breading from turning soggy.

Use a 10-inch non-stick skillet. Sure, cast-iron retains and distributes heat better than non-stick, but it also absorbs some of the oil, resulting in some waste. As for the size of the pan, using a smaller skillet will force the oil to rise up along the sides of whatever you’re cooking, which means you can get away with using less oil altogether.

Work in batches. Overcrowding the pan with shrimp will cause the temperature of the oil to drop, which will result in a soggy and greasy finished product.

Popcorn Shrimp with Cocktail Sauce – Paleo

Crispy, grain-free, gluten-free Popcorn Shrimp lightly fried to perfection and served with a Whole30 compliant cocktail sauce! It’s what dreams are made of!

For the Whole30 Cocktail Sauce:

  • ½ cup compliant sugar-free ketchup (such as Primal Kitchen or Tessemae’s)
  • 1 tablespoon prepared white horseradish
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon coconut aminos

For the Popcorn Shrimp:

  • 340 gr 26/30 or 16/20 shrimp (peeled, deveined, tail left on)
  • ¼ cup cassava flour
  • ¼ cup arrowroot starch
  • 1 large egg
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt (plus extra for serving)
  • ½ lemon (cut into wedges, for serving)
  • ¼ cup coconut oil (plus more if required)
  1. For the Whole30 Cocktail Sauce:
  2. In a bowl, combine the ketchup, horseradish, lemon juice, and coconut aminos.
  3. For the Popcorn Shrimp:
  4. Place the arrowroot starch, cassava flour and eggs into three separate mixing bowls. Season the cassava flour with the paprika, onion powder, and a ¼ teaspoon each of salt and pepper and stir through to incorporate. Add 1 tablespoon of water to the egg and whisk vigorously until frothy.
  5. Dredge the shrimp in the arrowroot starch, then dip into the egg wash, and finally dredge in the seasoned cassava flour.
  6. Heat a 10-inch non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the coconut oil and heat for 1 to 2 minutes, or until it reaches 350F. Shake off any excess breading from the shrimp and carefully add it to the hot oil. Cook the shrimp until it’s golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and cook an additional 2 to 3 minutes or until cooked through. Transfer the popcorn shrimp to a plate lined with paper towel to soak up excess oil and season with a pinch of kosher salt.
  7. Serve immediately with lemon wedges and cocktail sauce.

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A Guide to Healthy Oils – Whole30, Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/guide-healthy-oils-cooking http://cookprimalgourmet.com/guide-healthy-oils-cooking#respond Wed, 21 Aug 2019 19:48:18 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4766

Looking for healthy oils or fats to cook with? This guide will help you narrow down the selection and make the most of each ingredient.

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In our second instalment of “Wellness Wednesdays”, Thrive Market and I have partnered to answer two very frequently asked questions: “What are some healthy oils or fats to cook with and how do I know when to use them?”

In this article, I highlight the different healthy oils and fats for cooking that I use most often and provide some information to help you make the most of each ingredient. Each healthy oil listed here is Paleo and Whole30 friendly, making it perfectly suitable whether you’re crushing a round or discovering your Food Freedom.

Thrive Market Virgin Coconut Oil Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30

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If you’re new to Thrive Market, it’s an online marketplace that offers thousands of the best-selling organic foods and natural products for 25-50% below traditional retail prices. Not only do they carry a fantastic variety of healthy cooking fats, but they also stock their own Thrive Market Private Label ones, which are high-quality and more affordable than most of the competition.

If you missed our first Wellness Wednesday instalment, you can find the informative article about Paleo and Whole30 Alternative Flours here.

New to Thrive Market? Click here to receive 25%-OFF your first purchase and a FREE 30-Day Trial.

A General Rule of Thumb for Healthy Oils…

When it comes to deciding which healthy oil or fat to cook with, I tend to think about things in the same way that I think about ingredients and flavour combinations. First and foremost, I look to the type of cuisine and try to learn more about the oils or fats that are commonly used in that culture or geographic location.

I also try to think about what would enhance or pair with the flavours of what it is I’m cooking. As with most things in cooking, this comes through trial and error so I encourage you to experiment in the kitchen! Another consideration is the cost of the oil itself. I always try to look for the highest quality at the best possible price, which is one of the reasons I love the Thrive Market Private Label products. Lastly, I try to consider whether or not the oil is suitable to the type of cooking I’m doing.

If you think about it, there’s a reason Greek, Italian, Spanish and other Mediterranean cultures cook with extra-virgin olive oil more than any other type of fat. Olives grow in these climates so it’s a local, available and, oftentimes, sustainable ingredient. And, equally important, certain foods in these cuisines just taste better when paired with certain fats. For example, you could probably use coconut oil to make Ragu Bolognese, but it won’t taste as good if you did.

There are, however, times where I choose to break the unwritten rules for health or budget considerations. For example, I like to make Tostones with coconut oil or avocado oil because I find the flavours to pair well with one another. I often buy these oils in larger sizes so it’s budget-friendly and I prefer them because they’re healthier alternatives to the more traditional canola or refined vegetable oils commonly used to deep-fry plantains in Latin American countries.

Thrive Market Extra Virgin Olive Oil Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30

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Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

Extra-virgin olive oil is one of my go-to cooking fats. It’s great for homemade salad dressings and vinaigrettes or fresh sauces like salsa verde or chimichurri. I also use it to marinate grilled veggies like these onions. Every now and then, I will use extra-virgin olive oil when cooking foods at lower temperatures. For example, when sautéing seafood or vegetables or if roasting meats below or around 400F. I do this when I want to impart some flavour or colour into a dish.

Perhaps like you, I’ve read some conflicting studies when it comes to extra-virgin olive oil’s smoking point. Whereas some studies indicate instability and deterioration at low heat, others, like this 2007 study, report that it is suitable for cooking, insofar as it is truly extra-virgin and rich in antioxidants. Clearly, I’ll have to do some more research before siding with one conclusion over the other and I encourage you to do the same!

Thrive Market Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30

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Refined Avocado Oil

Next to extra-virgin olive oil, avocado oil is an essential part of my day-to-day cooking. It’s incredibly versatile, neutral in flavor, light in color, and has a high-smoking point, making it suitable for cooking at high temperatures. Use it for everything from stir-fries to pan-seared steaks.

It’s extremely popular with the Paleo and Whole30 crowd because it’s not only a healthy source of fat, but it’s also neutral in flavour and light in colour, making it perfect for homemade mayonnaise.

Do not try to make homemade mayonnaise with extra-virgin olive oil. It is too bitter and will impart an undesirable flavour. Also, I advise against using “light” tasting olive oils because they are highly processed and devoid of nutrition.

Thrive Market Virgin Coconut Healthy Oils Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30

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Coconut oil

Coconut oil is a healthy fat with a high-smoking point, making it suitable for cooking at hot temperatures. The trade off is that it imparts some flavor. Try using it in recipes that have complimentary flavors, such as Thai curries, Asian stir-fries, or anywhere else you want to add coconut flavor. I’m told it’s also a great conditioner for your hair. I wouldn’t know because I’m bald.

Thrive Market Organic Ghee Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30

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Ghee

Unlike regular clarified butter, which involves skimming dairy solids as they foam on the surface, ghee is made by slowly heating butter to the point at which the dairy solidifies, browns and descends to the bottom of the pot. As a result, it is virtually dairy-free. It’s more intensely flavoured than butter with rich, nutty notes. Use it to make everything from fried eggs, to roasted potatoes, to basting chicken and steaks, to compound “butters”. Since it’s dairy-free, it has a high-smoking point and is suitable for cooking at hot temperatures.

This post is sponsored by Thrive Market. All thoughts and opinions are the author’s alone. Thank you for supporting the brands that support me.

All images courtesy of Thrive Market and may not be reproduced without prior written permission.

 

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Honey and Balsamic Grilled Peaches – Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/honey-balsamic-grilled-peaches http://cookprimalgourmet.com/honey-balsamic-grilled-peaches#respond Sun, 18 Aug 2019 15:25:25 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4756

Honey and Balsamic Grilled Peaches are one of my favourite summertime desserts. They’re super easy to prepare and a healthy way to finish a meal.

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Honey and Balsamic Grilled Peaches are one of my favourite summertime desserts. They’re super easy to prepare and a great way to make the most of stone fruit season.

As the peaches grill, the fruit softens and the natural sugars caramelize and char ever so slightly. The combination of flavours and textures is out of this world and a perfect base for a wide variety of toppings.

Grilled Peaches Honey and Balsamic Glaze Paleo Primal Gourmet Summer Recipe BBQ

Here, I keep things very simple with a drizzle of high-quality honey, a bit of balsamic glaze, toasted walnuts and some fresh mint for colour and a pop of flavour. The honey and balsamic glaze work together to create an amazing balance of sweet and sour, especially for someone like me that doesn’t really have a sweet tooth.

I know, I know! Balsamic may not be the first thing you think of when it comes to dessert but when it’s reduced to a glaze, it makes for an amazingly sweet yet slightly sour sauce that elevates just about anything you drizzle it on. Just make sure you use a balsamic glaze and not a regular vinegar, which is far too sour.

Grilled Peaches Honey and Balsamic Glaze Paleo Primal Gourmet Summer Recipe BBQ

I recommend looking for a balsamic glaze that is all-natural and free of any additives or refined sugars. Most glazes are loaded with thickeners like guar gum or corn starch, artificial colouring, and plenty of sugar to make it sweeter than necessary. I use this DeNigris 100% All-Natural Balsamic Glaze, or any one of these Kouzini Balsamic Vinegars, which are also all-natural. You can’t go wrong with either!

If you want to try making your own glaze, simply add regular balsamic vinegar into a sauce pan and gently heat over a medium-low flame until reduced and the glaze can coat the back of a spoon, about 12 minutes.

Grilled Peaches Honey and Balsamic Glaze Paleo Primal Gourmet Summer Recipe BBQ

As always, feel free to play around with any combination of toppings you like! You’re the boss, applesauce! Try substituting hazelnuts, pecans or almonds, if that’s what you have on hand. Maybe serve the grilled peaches with some freshly-whipped coconut cream? Or, take things over the top with some scoops of dairy-free vanilla ice cream!

For best results, use slightly unripened peaches here. Not only is it easier to remove the pits from a slightly firm peach, but it’s also easier to handle on the grill. Don’t worry if the peaches are not as sweet or soft as you like. As they grill, they will sweeten and soften. And don’t forget, you can always compensate with a bit more honey, if desired.

Grilled Peaches Honey and Balsamic Glaze Paleo Primal Gourmet Summer Recipe BBQ

Although a ripe peach is sweeter, it will start to break down on the grill, making it more difficult to handle and achieve those beautiful grill marks you’re after. I’d also rather save the ripe, in-season peaches for eating on their own!

If you don’t have a grill, or you don’t feel like grilling in the pouring rain, feel free to use a grill pan to cook the peaches. I always recommend this Lodge model, which is a great value. It does require some cast-iron maintenance, but it will last forever if you take care of it. For an enamel-coated cast-iron grill pan, I recommend this Staub model. It’s more expensive, but it doesn’t require maintenance and is an heirloom piece of cookware that will also last forever if taken care of.

Grilled Peaches with Honey and Balsamic Glaze – Paleo

Grilled Peaches with Honey and Balsamic Glaze are one of my favourite summertime desserts. They’re super easy to prepare and a great way to make the most of stone fruit season.

  • 1.5 pounds peaches (slightly unripened)
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • ¼ cup raw (unsalted walnuts)
  • 2 tablespoons honey (or more if desired)
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic glaze
  • 8 mint leaves (roughly torn)
  1. Preheat a grill or grill pan to medium-high heat.
  2. Cut peaches into quarters and remove pits. Brush all sides with coconut oil and grill until grill marks form, 4 to 5 minutes. Flip and grill an additional 4 to 5 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, add walnuts to a dry pan and place over medium-low heat. Toast the nuts, stirring occasionally, until warmed through and fragrant. Remove from pan and set aside.
  4. Transfer peaches to a serving platter. Drizzle them with honey and balsamic glaze, top with toasted walnuts and garnish with mint. Serve while still warm.

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Grilled Onions with Balsamic – Whole30, Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/grilled-onions-balsamic-whole30-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/grilled-onions-balsamic-whole30-paleo#respond Thu, 15 Aug 2019 16:28:40 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4740

Juicy grilled onions marinated in extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and fresh oregano are the ultimate Whole30 side dish for your next cookout!

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If you watch my Instagram step-by-step cooking stories, it should come as no surprise that I’m a huge fan of grilled onions. If I’m firing up my Traeger grill, or any other grill for that matter, I will undoubtedly throw on some thick, red onion rings.

They’re super easy to prepare, cook quickly and are absolutely delicious. The natural sugars in the onions caramelize and sweeten, and I can’t get enough of the wood-fired flavour from cooking them on my Traeger.

Grilled Onions Marinated Balsamic Vinegar Oregano Whole30 Primal Gourmet Paleo Recipe BBQ

Most times, I’ll simply brush the onion rings in some oil and season them with salt and pepper before grilling. This time, I tried something a bit different and the results were nothing short of amazing.

Rather than season the onions before grilling, I marinated them afterwards in some extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, fresh oregano and salt and pepper. The warm, grilled onions soaked up all of the flavours like delicious little sponges.

There are two small but significant steps to note here. First, I like to cut the onion rings fairly thick, about 1”, so that they hold together on the grill a bit better and so that they don’t get too soft. I serve these onions as a vegetable side dish so I like it when they have some texture. The outside chars a bit, caramelizes and softens, and the inside stays juicy and crunchy.

Grilled Onions Marinated Balsamic Vinegar Oregano Whole30 Primal Gourmet Paleo Recipe BBQ

Secondly, I don’t season them with salt before cooking. This too has to do with texture. Salt will draw out moisture from the onions and soften them while they cook. This is one of the only times I will advise against salting before cooking, but here it works for the texture I’m trying to achieve.

If you don’t have a grill, you can cook the onions on your stovetop using a grill pan. I always recommend this Lodge model, which is a great value. It does require some cast-iron maintenance, but it will last forever if you take care of it.

For an enamel-coated cast-iron grill pan, I recommend this Staub model. It’s more expensive, but it doesn’t require maintenance and is an heirloom piece of cookware that will also last forever if taken care of.

 

Grilled Onions with Balsamic

  • 1.5 pounds red onions (about 4 medium onions, cut into 1” rings)
  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (preferably aged)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano (finely chopped, or substitute fresh thyme, marjoram, parsley, dill, basil, or chives)
  • Kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper to taste
  1. Preheat a grill over medium-high heat. If using a Traeger, preheat to 425F for 10 minutes.
  2. Brush both sides of each onion ring with avocado oil. Grill over direct heat until slightly charred, about 3 to 4 minutes. Flip and cook an additional 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl, drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, add oregano and season with salt and pepper to taste. Toss to coat and serve warm.

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Coffee Rub Grilled Steak – Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/coffee-rub-steak-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/coffee-rub-steak-paleo#respond Fri, 09 Aug 2019 17:21:49 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4727

Try seasoning your favourite steak with this easy and flavourful coffee rub. It adds a serious amount of flavour and beautiful colour!

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Coffee rub and steak may sound like an odd paring at first, but once you try it, you’ll want it over and over again! Assuming, of course, you like steak… and coffee!

When it comes to steak, I’m somewhat of a purist, choosing to season my meat with little more than salt and pepper. A few years ago, I made a conscious decision to try to purchase smaller amounts of higher-quality beef (grass-fed, organic and humanely raised), which costs a premium, rather than buying larger amounts of low-quality beef (grain-fed, mass-produced, full of hormones). In my opinion, the more-for-less trade off is a fair one considering the impact on the health of my family as well as the environment.

Coffee Rub Skirt Steak Grilled Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 BBQ Summer Recipe

All of this to say that if I’m paying a premium for beef, the last thing I want to do is drown out any of the subtle nuances in flavour with a boatload of seasonings. This usually applies to higher-priced, prime cuts like NY strips, ribeyes, or tenderloins. Not to say that you can’t marinade or rub any of these cuts in your favourite seasonings. In fact, this Coffee Rub is great for any cut. It’s just not my personal favourite thing to do. But hey, you’re the boss, applesauce!

Every now and then, if using a slightly leaner or tougher cut, like flank steak, skirt steak, or flat iron, I might choose to marinade it in some oil, herbs, citrus and spices to add flavour that may otherwise be lacking in the form of marbling. Less coveted cuts like these are not only delicious when cooked properly, but they’re also great entry points into purchasing higher-quality beef.

The skirt steak I used in this recipe, for example, cost just under $15/lb, compared to a NY striploin that can cost upwards of $45/lb! Making these kinds of decisions saves me money and provides more servings.

Another way to save money is to make your own spice rubs. It’s a quick and easy thing to do and allows you to control the quality of ingredients and sodium levels. Most spice rubs are very high in salt, even for a salt lover like myself.

Coffee Rub Skirt Steak Grilled Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 BBQ Summer Recipe

This Coffee Rub is perfect for just about any cut of steak (even pork and lamb, for that matter) and there’s a strong chance you already have all of the ingredients for it in your pantry. It adds a tremendous amount of flavour and colour so please don’t knock it ‘till you try it.

The coffee in the rub is subtle and pairs beautifully with the chili powders, onion and paprika. For best results, try grinding whole beans at home, preferably ones that are freshly roasted. You’ll want to grind them very, very fine (set your grinder to the espresso setting). Otherwise, you’ll be left with shards of coffee beans that make the steak taste gritty. Same thing goes if you’re buying pre-ground coffee. Use a very finely ground espresso grind.

Note: Coffee varies wildly in flavour and quality. I find dark roasts to be a bit overpowering in this coffee rub so I recommend a finely-ground, medium-roast. Keeping with the whole more-for-less approach, try to source single-origin, fair-trade, organic coffee beans. Better yet, find a local roaster that roasts beans on site. Or, subscribe to a coffee subscription service that will deliver different fresh roasts straight to your door.

To balance the bitter notes in the coffee rub, I use a small amount of coconut sugar, which keeps things paleo. The coconut sugar is a key ingredient here so save it for your Food Freedom if you’re doing a round of Whole30.

To add even more flavour to the steak, I grill it on my Traeger Grill, which uses 100% all-natural wood pellets and indirect, convection heat. The wood imparts a slightly smokey flavour that is hard to beat and difficult to achieve on a conventional gas grill. Nevertheless, if you only have gas or charcoal then feel free to use that. If so, try substituting smoked paprika instead of the sweet paprika in the coffee rub. This little swap will trick your taste buds into thinking the steak was grilled over a wood fire.

To round out the meal, and make full use of my grill, I cooked some sweet potatoes, zucchini, green onion and red bell peppers (see video above). The result was an amazing end to a long and challenging week!

Coffee Rub Grilled Steak – Paleo

Try seasoning your favourite steak with this easy and flavourful coffee rub. It adds a serious amount of flavour and beautiful colour!

  • 1 tablespoon finely ground coffee
  • 2 teaspoons coconut sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon granulated onion
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • ½ teaspoon ancho chili powder (substitute favourite chili powder)
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1.5 pounds skirt steak (substitute flank steak, ribeye, NY strip or tenderloin)
  • 2 teaspoons avocado oil
  • ¼ teaspoon flakey salt (such as Maldon, for serving)
  1. In a bowl, combine the coffee, coconut sugar, salt, granulated onion, paprika, chili powder, and cayenne. Stir with a whisk or spoon until incorporated. Pat the skirt steak dry with paper towel and massage both sides with avocado oil. Liberally season both sides of the steak with the spice rub, cover and set aside at room temperature for 45 minutes. If preparing the steak in advance, refrigerate it up to 24 hours and remove it from the fridge 1 hour before grilling so that the meat can come to room temperature.

  2. Preheat your Traeger grill to 450F. Transfer the steak to the back of the grates where the grill is hottest. Close the lid and cook until seared and slightly blackened, 3 to 4 minutes. Flip and cook, for medium-rare, until the thickest part of the steak registers between 135F and 140F, an additional 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer steak to a board and let rest at least 6 minutes before slicing against the grain. Season with a pinch of flakey salt.

If using a gas grill, preheat your grill to high heat. Place the steak over direct heat and grill until seared and slightly blackened, 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and cook, for medium-rare, until the thickest part of the steak registers between 135F and 140F, an additional 2 to 3 minutes.

If using a charcoal grill, heat coals until they form a white ash. Place the steak over direct heat and grill until seared and slightly blackened, 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and cook, for medium-rare, until the thickest part of the steak registers between 135F and 140F, an additional 2 to 3 minutes.

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A Guide to Alternative Flours – Whole30, Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/guide-alternative-flours-whole30-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/guide-alternative-flours-whole30-paleo#comments Wed, 07 Aug 2019 18:27:47 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4693

In this article, I outline the alternative flours that I think should be in every home cook’s pantry, particularly those who are looking for healthy alternatives to conventional grain flours.

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In this inaugural Wellness Wednesdays blog post, sponsored by Thrive Market, I’m sharing a guide to Paleo and Whole30 Alternative Flours.

Alternative flours are absolutely essential to my day-to-day cooking. I use them to dredge meats, thicken sauces, and make my famous Paleo Pancakes and Banana Bread. They’re ideal for people with gluten allergies or sensitivities and those looking for healthy, low-glycemic options to replace traditional grain flours.

Thrive Market not only carries a fantastic variety of alternative flours, but they also stock their own Private Label ones, which are high-quality and more affordable than most of the competition.

New to Thrive Market? Click here to receive 25%-OFF your first purchase and a FREE 30-Day Trial.

 

When I first began my health journey back in 2013, it was very difficult to find anything other than almond flour and coconut flour. When I did manage to track a bag down, it was expensive! It’s amazing to see the variety of alternative flours now available throughout North America. In addition to almond and coconut flours, you can find cassava flour, arrowroot starch, and tapioca starch, to name a few. The best part is that with Thrive Market you can conveniently order each of these online and have them shipped to you.

In this article, I outline the alternative flours that I think should be in every home cook’s pantry, particularly those who are looking for healthy alternatives to conventional grain flours. I also answer some frequently asked questions that I hope will help you make the most of each ingredient.

Each alternative flour listed here is gluten-free and has its own unique texture, taste and function. It’s important to know when to use which flour or you run the risk of ruining an entire dish in terms of taste and texture.

I’ve restricted the list to include only Paleo and Whole30 options, since that is the main focus of my recipes and how I eat on a day-to-day basis. However, there are many more flours that can be included in your Food Freedom, such as buckwheat flour, chickpea (AKA garbanzo bean) flour, amaranth flour, banana flour, rice flour, and quinoa flour, to name a few. Although I use it sparingly, Chickpea flour is a personal favourite because I use it to make socca (a wonderful and simple type of grain-free and gluten-free flat bread).

It’s important to note that although each of these flours are technically Whole30 compliant ingredients, when used to make a healthy, paleo version of certain unhealthy treat foods, like my Paleo Pancakes, they fall under the category of SWYPO and are off limits during your round of the program. Nevertheless, they are perfectly suited to other applications, like using arrowroot starch to lightly dredge chicken for my Chicken with Mushroom and Tarragon Cream Sauce.

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Almond Flour

Perhaps the most popular of all alternative flours, almond flour is made from ground and dried almonds. It has a rich flavour profile and will add a subtle nuttiness to sweet and savoury recipes. Although it is fairly soft and compressible, almond flour is relatively coarse in texture and, therefore, can impart a bit of grittiness depending on how you use it.

Almond flour is not only great for making baked goods, like Biscotti, and paleo pie crusts, but it’s also good for dredging meats and seafood, such as chicken and salmon. It adds colour, flavour and texture, but keep in mind that it is coarse and has a hard time sticking to foods without the addition of a binder, such as an egg wash. Even when using a binder, it can still crumble off during cooking. To prevent this from happening, try mixing 2 parts almond flour with 1 part arrowroot starch. This will help the almond flour to stick to meats and seafood when frying and if any of the flour falls off, the arrowroot starch will be there to get golden brown.

Try using Thrive Market Almond Flour to make my Paleo Biscotti or Banana Bread.

Almond flour is low in carbohydrates, high in healthy fats and relatively high in protein. In a 2 tablespoon serving, there are 2 gr of carbohydrates, are 7 gr of fat, and 3 gr of protein.

Buy on Thrive Market

Coconut Flour

Coconut flour has become a more and more common ingredient in recent years. Not least because it is a very affordable alternative flour. Thrive Market Organic Coconut Flour costs a mere $3.49 for a 16-ounce bag!  It is made from dehydrated, finely ground organic coconut meat (the white flesh that you see when you crack into one). Like almond flour, it is fairly coarse in texture and can impart some grittiness in certain recipes.

Coconut flour is most commonly used in baking recipes. It is very absorbent so if you plan on substituting it for regular wheat flour, be sure to use less than a 1:1 ratio or you will end up with a very dense finished product.

Another thing to consider is that coconut flour may impart a bit of flavour into whatever it is you’re cooking. Like olives and cilantro, coconut is an acquired taste for some people so keep that in mind before purchasing and using. Almond flour is a more neutral-flavoured alternative. If you are allergic to nuts, try cassava flour instead. But you should be aware that if you are using these substitutes, measurements will vary because they are not as absorbent as coconut flour.

I don’t use it as often as other flours, but coconut flour is a main ingredient in my Paleo Banana Bread.

Coconut flour is relatively high in carbohydrates but rich in fibre, and relatively low in fat and protein. In a 2 tablespoon serving, there are 10 gr of carbohydrates, with 7 gr of dietary fibre, 3.5 gr of fat, and 3 gr of protein.

Buy on Thrive Market

Cassava Flour

Cassava flour is my personal favourite alternative flour. It is made from peeled, ground and dried whole cassava root, as opposed to tapioca starch, which is made from the same root but with a different process, as discussed below.

Cassava flour is extremely versatile, neutral in flavour, and can replace wheat flour in most recipes at a 1:1 ratio. It gets super crispy when fried and sticks very well to meat and seafood, making it excellent for dredging. It can be used to make incredible paleo biscuits, grain-free pancakes, and even homemade tortillas. It is a true workhorse in the kitchen and absolutely worth the relatively higher price tag compared to other alternative flours.

If a recipe calls for cassava flour, it is always best to try to use it. In most cases, the finished product will be very different if substituting, so I don’t advise it. If, however, a recipe calls for cassava flour to dredge meat or seafood and you don’t have any, you can try substituting 2 parts almond flour with 1 part arrowroot starch. This would get you by in my recipe for Paleo Popcorn Chicken, for example, but it may not work for others. Cassava flour reacts differently when it comes into contact with water and heat than almond flour. It also gets much crispier than both arrowroot and almond flour.

Use Thrive Market Non-GMO Cassava Flour to make homemade grain-free pastas, pie crusts, paleo tortillas, Apple Crumbles, and Paleo Popcorn Chicken.

Cassava flour is high in carbohydrates, fat-free and low in protein. Therefore, I wouldn’t exactly recommend it as a “health food”. But in low quantities it can be a fantastic addition to your pantry. A ¼ cup serving has 28 gr of carbohydrates, 0 gr of fat, and 1 gr of protein.

Buy on Thrive Market

Arrowroot Powder 

Also referred to as arrowroot flour or arrowroot starch, this finely ground white substance is neutral-flavoured and plays an essential role in my daily cooking. I use it primarily to thicken sauces (either worked into a roux or a slurry) and to dredge meats and seafood. Because it has a very fine consistency, it sticks to things like glue. It also gets golden brown and slightly crispy when fried.

Word to the wise:

Arrowroot powder is like culinary confetti. It get’s all over the place! If using it to dredge meat or seafood, add it to a deep bowl to prevent it from spilling over.

Arrowroot flour is made from arrowroot, a type of tuber. Similar to tapioca flour, it is extracted from the washed, peeled and pulverized arrowroot. The pulp is squeezed and a wet starch is extracted and then left to dry. The remaining powder is the arrowroot flour or starch.

Arrowroot flour is, in my opinion, a better flour to use for dredging meat and seafood than tapioca flour. A 16-ounce bag of Thrive Market Organic Arrowroot flour is only $4.49, making it very affordable! It doesn’t get as gummy as tapioca flour so it is a bit more forgiving for times when you are cooking larger batches of my Paleo Popcorn Chicken or Chicken Saltimbocca.

Though arrowroot powder and tapioca flour are, for the most part, interchangeable, I like to use them for certain things. For example, I prefer tapioca flour for my Paleo Pancakes because it gets spongier than arrowroot starch. On the other hand, I like arrowroot starch for dredging and thickening sauces, because it doesn’t get as gummy.

If you use arrowroot flour to a make a slurry to thicken sauces, soups or stews, you should mix it with a bit of cold water first. Adding it directly to a hot liquid will cause it to clump. You don’t need a lot of tapioca starch for it to work as a thickening agent and it’s usually best to stick to a 1:1 or 1:2 ratio of starch to water. So, for 1 teaspoon of arrowroot starch, mix it with 1 or 2 teaspoons of water.

If on the, other hand, you want to use it to make a roux, feel free to simply toast the arrowroot flour in some cooking fat as you would with traditional wheat flour.

Arrowroot flour is high in carbohydrates, fat-free and has no protein. A ¼ cup serving has 28 gr of carbohydrates, 0 gr of fat and 0 gr of protein.

Buy on Thrive Market

Tapioca Flour

Tapioca flour, also referred to as tapioca starch, is not to be confused with cassava flour. Though they are both made from the cassava root, they are completely different in texture and function.

Tapioca flour is made from cassava root that has been peeled, washed and pulverized. Once the pulp is squeezed, a starch is extracted and left to dry. The water is then left to evaporate, leaving behind a dried flour or starch.

Tapioca flour is a much, much finer powder and reacts differently than cassava flour when it comes into contact with water and heat. It does not have the same integrity as cassava flour, so it can not be used interchangeably.

When it comes to making my Paleo Pancakes, tapioca flour is the best alternative flour. When worked into a batter and lightly fried, it gets super spongy and fluffy on the inside and ever so crispy on the outside. It is also very affordable! Thrive Market Organic Tapioca Flour costs only $3.49 for an 18-ounce bag!

In certain cases, tapioca flour can be used interchangeably with arrowroot starch. This applies mostly for baking and thickening sauces. The important thing to keep in mind is texture.Tapioca flour gets gummier than arrowroot starch. So, if you’re going to be mixing it with a bit of water to create a slurry and thicken a sauce, you may notice a slightly sticky and tackier finished product. I, therefore, prefer to use tapioca flour for baking and pancakes because you don’t get that same gumminess.

Note: if you use tapioca flour to thicken sauces, soups or stews, you should mix it with a bit of cold water first. Adding it directly to a hot liquid will cause it to clump. You don’t need a lot of tapioca flour for it to work as a thickening agent and it’s usually best to stick to a 1:1 or 1:2 ratio of starch to water. So, for 1 teaspoon of tapioca starch, mix it with 1 or 2 teaspoons of water.

If you plan on using tapioca flour to dredge meat for frying, I strongly urge you to do so only at the very last minute. As mentioned, it gets gummy when it comes into contact with liquid so if you dredge, say, a piece of chicken and leave it on the counter for 10 minutes before frying, it will develop a tacky and slightly slimy film. This, in turn, will prevent you from getting a nice golden brown and crispy crust.

Tapioca flour is low in carbohydrates, fat-free and has no protein. A 1 tablespoon serving has 8 gr of carbohydrates, 0 gr of protein.

This post is sponsored by Thrive Market. All thoughts and opinions are the author’s alone. Thank you for supporting the brands that support me.

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Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken – Whole30, Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/cilantro-lime-chicken-whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/cilantro-lime-chicken-whole30#respond Sun, 04 Aug 2019 00:23:33 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4685

Easy, healthy & delicious, this Whole30 Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken is going to be a hit at your next cookout! Try it with grilled veggies or a zesty slaw!

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Easy, healthy and delicious, this Whole30 Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken is going to be a hit at your next cookout! It’s tangy, a bit spicy and thanks to a little hack, requires only one hour of marinating time!

The cilantro lime marinade packs a flavourful punch and can be used on beef, pork and certain types of seafood, like shrimp or red snapper. It consists of fresh cilantro, apple cider vinegar, some extra-virgin olive oil, fresh garlic, a couple of dry seasonings and fresh lime juice. Everything quickly comes together in a food processor or, if you’re like me and want to minimize cleanup, in a mason jar using an immersion blender.

Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Recipe BBQ Summertime

Here, I use the cilantro lime marinade to add a tremendous amount of flavour to whole chicken legs. The result is nothing short of delicious! And thanks to a simple and effective cooking hack, I significantly cut down on the marinating and cooking time!

It’s as easy as scoring the chicken legs with a sharp knife. This simple trick will not only allow the cilantro lime marinade to penetrate the meat down to the bone in a shorter period of time, but it will also speed up the cooking time by increasing the surface area of the chicken and exposing the centre of the meat. The same trick will work on separated drumsticks and thighs, if that’s what you have on hand.

What would normally require 4 hours of marinating and 45 minutes of cooking, can take as little as 1 hour of marinating and 30 minutes of cooking. That’s time better spent enjoying the outdoors with family and friends. Especially considering the short summers that we have in Toronto.

Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Recipe BBQ Summertime

This chicken is best cooked on the grill. Personally, I cook on a Traeger Grill, which uses 100% all-natural wood pellets. If you have charcoal or gas, that will work as well. The major difference, aside from flavour, is that Traegers work using indirect, convection heat, which makes it much easier to control temperature and prevent flare ups caused through direct-heat cooking.

If you don’t have a grill, you can just as easily roast the cilantro lime chicken in your oven. Cook it uncovered in an oven preheated to 400F for around 45minutes or until the thickest part registers 165F on an instant-read digital thermometer. To finish, you can quickly broil the chicken for a minute or two so that the skin crisps up a bit.

Serve the cilantro lime chicken with your favourite summer time sides. Grilled vegetables are a perfect paring. So are mashed sweet potatoes, tostones, or this zesty coleslaw.

Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken – Whole30, Paleo

Easy, healthy & delicious, this Whole30 Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken is going to be a hit at your next cookout! Try it with grilled veggies or a zesty slaw!

  • 3.5-4 lbs chicken legs (around 5 legs)
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • Juice 1 lime (plus 1 lime cut into wedges for serving)
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tbsp onion powder
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp cracked black pepper
  1. In a food processor, combine cilantro, garlic, lime juice, olive oil, vinegar, paprika, onion powder, salt, cayenne pepper, and black pepper. Pulse until incorporated yet chunky. For easier cleanup, add the ingredients to a wide-mouth mason jar and blend until incorporated yet chunky with an immersion blender.
  2. Score the chicken with a sharp knife and add it to a zip-top bag. Pour in all of the marinade, massage everything to coat, squeeze out as much air from the bag as possible, seal and refrigerate for 1 hour or up to 4 hours.
  3. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill to medium-low (approximately 375F). Cook the chicken over direct heat until golden-brown and crispy, flipping two or three times throughout, or until the thickest part registers 165F on an instant-read digital thermometer, about 25 to 30 minutes. If cooking on a Traeger Grill, preheat the grill to 165F and place the chicken in the centre of the grill. Cook the chicken for 30 minutes to infuse the meat with smoke flavour, then raise the heat to 425F and continue cooking until the chicken is golden brown and crispy, flipping once halfway through, or until the thickest part registers 165F on an instant-read digital thermometer, about 25 minutes.
  4. Transfer chicken to a serving platter, garnish with a few fresh cilantro leaves and serve with lime wedges.

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Grilled Chicken Niçoise Salad – Whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/grilled-chicken-nicoise-salad-paleo-whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/grilled-chicken-nicoise-salad-paleo-whole30#respond Thu, 25 Jul 2019 22:15:46 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4527

Grilled Chicken Niçoise Salad is one of my all-time favourite make-ahead meals. It's super easy to prepare and tastes great the next day!

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Grilled Chicken Niçoise Salad is one of my all-time favourite make-ahead meals. Not only is it super easy to prepare all of the ingredients, but it’s one of the few cases in which things actually taste great when served cold the next day. I’d like to think that this Niçoise salad is both adult and kid friendly and with back-to-school just around the corner it will be a great addition to your weekly lunch-time arsenal.

Grilled Chicken Niçoise Salad Primal Gourmet Paleo Whole30 Easy Lunch Recipe Back to School

Originally created in the city of Nice, along the southern coast of France, Salade Niçoise is a fresh, crisp and bright salad that is light yet filling. The best news? It’s Whole30 compliant, making it perfect for those who are tackling the upcoming September Whole30!

There are a variety of preparations and, as with most things classic and delicious, everyone has their opinion when it comes to what should and shouldn’t be included in a Niçoise salad. In my experience, the most popular versions of the salad are made with tuna (canned or freshly cooked), green beans (usually blanched), chopped tomatoes, hard-boiled eggs, sliced radish, black olives, tender, leafy greens, and boiled creamer potatoes. Sometimes, the tuna is replaced with anchovies for a briny punch of flavour. I’ve loved tuna for as long as I can remember, but I know that canned fish can be a tough sell for some kiddos (and adults). Especially if you’re already trying to get them to eat a salad!

Here, I replace the fish with grilled chicken breast simply seasoned in some salt, pepper, dehydrated onion and chili flakes for a touch of spice. I also grill the green beans, getting a bit of char on them for added flavour, and season them in some Everything But the Bagel Seasoning from Trader Joes. If you don’t have the spice blend, it’s a combination of poppy seeds, white and black sesame seeds, dehydrated garlic and onion, and salt. To add even more flavour to the salad, I toss the boiled potatoes in some extra-virgin olive oil and fresh dill.

Grilled Chicken Niçoise Salad Primal Gourmet Paleo Whole30 Easy Lunch Recipe Back to School

To cut down on prep time and clean up, I boil the potatoes and eggs in the same pot. While the eggs will take exactly 12 minutes, the potatoes can take between 16 and 18, depending on their size. I encourage you to boil the creamer potatoes whole because otherwise they will start to crumble in the water. If cooking indoors, I use a cast-iron grill pan to cook the chicken and green beans. I won’t lie, the chicken tastes much, much better when cooked on the Traeger, but a grill-pan will get the job done.

If you’re in a serious time crunch, feel free to simply dress the salad with some extra-virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar and a pinch of salt and pepper. If, however, you want to take things to the next level, make a quick-and-easy Red Wine Vinaigrette. The flavours from the grainy mustard, honey and garlic are perfect with the salad ingredients. Just keep in mind that honey is off limits during Whole30, so feel free to omit if you’re making the dressing while doing a round.

As always, I think you should feel free to experiment with different versions of this salad and see which combinations of flavours and ingredients you like best. After all, you’re the one that has to eat it! Try adding julienned red bell pepper, canned artichoke hearts, sliced cucumbers, or substitute grilled salmon. You’re the boss, applesauce!

Grilled Chicken Niçoise Salad – Whole30

  • 1.5 pounds yellow creamer potatoes
  • 8 large eggs
  • Kosher salt
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/8 cup finely chopped fresh dill
  • 2 pounds boneless (skinless chicken breast (about 4 large breasts), sliced in half, horizontally, and tenderloins separated)
  • 2 teaspoons dehydrated onion flakes
  • 1 teaspoon dried red chili flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 1/2 pound green beans
  • 2 teaspoons Everything But the Bagel Seasoning from Trader Joe’s (or other brand)
  • 2 large heads of green leaf lettuce (about 1.5 pounds, roughly torn into 2-inch strips)
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes (sliced in half)
  • 4 large red radishes (or 8 small, thinly sliced into discs)
  • 1/2 cup black olives (such as Kalamata)

For the Red Wine Vinaigrette

  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons grainy mustard
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 2 small cloves garlic (finely grated)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper

For the Red Wine Vinaigrette:

  1. Add all of the ingredients to a mason jar, seal and shake vigorously until emulsified. Set aside at room temperature for up to 1 hour or refrigerate up to 2 weeks. If refrigerating, let thaw 10 minutes before serving.

For the Niçoise Salad:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Season the water with 2 tablespoons of salt and add the potatoes and eggs. Cook the eggs exactly 12 minutes and transfer them to an ice bath until cooled. Cook the potatoes until fork tender, 16 to 18 minutes. Drain the potatoes and let cool in the pot.
  2. Peel the eggs under running water, slice in half and set aside. Slice the potatoes in half and toss to coat with 2 tablespoons olive oil and dill. Set aside
  3. Preheat a cast-iron grill pan or grill over medium-high heat. Drizzle the chicken with olive oil and season both sides with onion flakes, chili flakes, salt and pepper. Cook the chicken until grill marks form, about 4 minutes, then flip and cook an additional 3 minutes or until the thickest part of the breast registers 165F on an instant-read meat thermometer. If using a grill pan, work in batches so as not to overcrowd the pan. Transfer the chicken to a board and set aside.
  4. Wipe the grill pan clean and set over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil and cook the green beans, flipping regularly, until slightly charred, about 5 minutes. Season with 1 teaspoon Everything But the Bagel seasoning and toss to coat. Set aside.
  5. To assemble the salad, lay down a bed of lettuce and top with potatoes, eggs, grilled chicken, green beans, tomatoes, radish, and olives. Drizzle with red wine vinaigrette and serve. Can be refrigerated individually or assembled for 4 to 5 days.

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Paleo Popcorn Chicken with Honey Mustard http://cookprimalgourmet.com/paleo-popcorn-chicken http://cookprimalgourmet.com/paleo-popcorn-chicken#comments Wed, 17 Jul 2019 00:32:04 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4515

Crispy, tender, juicy morsels of Popcorn Chicken, served alongside a quick-and-easy Honey Mustard sauce. How good does that sound for a weeknight dinner!

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Crispy, tender, juicy morsels of Paleo Popcorn Chicken, served alongside a quick-and-easy Honey Mustard sauce. How good does that sound on a Tuesday night? Try serving it with some Roasted Sweet Potato Wedges and a side salad of choice.

Thanks to the arrowroot starch and cassava flour, this Paleo Popcorn Chicken is both grain-free and gluten-free. Though the ingredients for the chicken are Whole30-compliant, this would definitely be considered SWYPO and off-limits during your round. The Honey Mustard also has a bit of honey in it (obviously), which is off-limits as well.

Paleo Popcorn Chicken Honey Mustard Primal Gourmet Easy RecipePaleo Popcorn Chicken Honey Mustard Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Nevertheless, the Popcorn Chicken and Honey Mustard are both Paleo-friendly and great for life after Whole30. I also have a feeling they’ll be kid-approved!

Feel free to substitute chicken breast if that’s what you have on hand. I had thighs so that’s what I used. I also tend to prefer dark meat if given the choice and I was not disappointed here. The chicken turned out super juicy and delicious.

Paleo Popcorn Chicken Honey Mustard Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Here are a couple of tips that will help ensure the crispiest Paleo Popcorn Chicken:

Be sure to only dredge the chicken immediately before frying. Alternative flours like arrowroot starch and cassava flour tend to get gummy after they come into contact with moisture. Working in batches will help prevent the breading from turning soggy.

Use a 10-inch non-stick skillet. Sure, cast-iron retains and distributes heat better than non-stick, but it also absorbs some of the oil, resulting in some waste. As for the size of the pan, using a smaller skillet will force the oil to rise up along the sides of whatever you’re cooking, which means you can get away with using less oil altogether.

Work in batches. Overcrowding the pan with chicken will cause the temperature of the oil to drop, which will result in a soggy and greasy finished product.

Paleo Popcorn Chicken Honey Mustard Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Paleo Popcorn Chicken with Honey Mustard

Crispy, tender, juicy morsels of Popcorn Chicken, served alongside a quick-and-easy Honey Mustard sauce. How good does that sound for a weeknight dinner!

For the Honey Mustard

  • ¼ cup Whole30 or Paleo compliant mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons grainy mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder

For the Popcorn Chicken

  • ½ cup arrowroot starch
  • ½ cup cassava flour
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1.5 lbs chicken thighs (cut into 1-inch cubes)
  • 1/3 cup avocado oil
  • ½ lemon (cut into wedges, for serving)

For the Honey Mustard:

  1. In a bowl, combine the mayo, Dijon, grainy mustard, honey

For the Popcorn Chicken

  1. Place the arrowroot starch, cassava flour and eggs into three separate mixing bowls. Season the cassava flour with the paprika, onion powder, and a ¼ teaspoon each of salt and pepper and stir through to incorporate. Add 2 tablespoons of water to the eggs and whisk vigorously until frothy.
  2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Dredge the chicken in the arrowroot starch, then dip into the egg wash, and finally dredge in the seasoned cassava flour.
  3. Heat a 10-inch non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the avocado oil and heat for 1 to 2 minutes, or until it reaches 350F. Shake off any excess breading from the chicken and carefully add it to the hot oil. Cook the chicken until it’s golden brown, about 3 minutes. Flip and cook an additional 3 minutes or until cooked through. Transfer the popcorn chicken to a plate lined with paper towel to soak up excess oil.
  4. Serve immediately with lemon wedges and honey mustard.

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Hot Honey Garlic Wings – Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/hot-honey-garlic-wings-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/hot-honey-garlic-wings-paleo#comments Thu, 20 Jun 2019 21:30:54 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4503

These baked Hot Honey Garlic Wings are just as delicious as the deep-fried ones from your favourite sports bar, but they're way healthier.

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Hot Honey Garlic Wings have quickly become one of my favourite things to eat. They’re saucy, tangy, a teeny bit spicy, incredibly easy to make, and way healthier than the deep-fried Buffalo wings you get from your local sports bar.

For a Whole30-friendly version, try omitting the honey in the sauce. It will taste more like your standard Buffalo wing, but that’s never a bad thing.Hot Honey Garlic Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy RecipeYou don’t have to serve them with my Dill Pickle Mayo, but I don’t think you’ll regret it if you did. You can find the recipe for the dipping sauce along with my Dill Pickle Wings by clicking here.

Hot Honey Garlic Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Recipe

7 Tips For Perfectly Baked Chicken Wings

There are a few secrets to making perfectly crispy chicken wings in the oven and I’ll share them all with you here:

1. Pat Wings Dry

Regardless of whether or not you rinse your chicken before cooking, you should be patting them dry with paper towel. Excess moisture will prevent them from getting golden brown and crispy.

2. Lay Wings Flat.

Piling wings one atop the other will just cause them to steam and make them soggy.

3. Space Them Out.

Leave a bit of room between each wing. Increased surface area results in a crispier finished product. If necessary, roast in batches or on separate baking sheets.

4. Roast Hot and Fast.

Wings are tiny little things and they cook fairly evenly. This means you can crank up the temperature without fear of burning the outside before the centre has had a chance to cook through.

5. Parchment Paper is Your Friend.

It makes clean up a breeze and prevents wings and spices from sticking to the baking sheet. Unlike tin foil, parchment doesn’t leach metals. It also doesn’t tear as easily as foil and possibly end up in your food.

6. Don’t Bother Flipping Halfway.

Opening the oven mid-cook let’s precious heat escape. By the time that heat builds back up to make your wings crispy, they’ll have overcooked on the inside.

7. Roast on the Bottom Rack of the Oven.

This is the hottest part of the oven and if you’ve laid your wings flat, as mentioned in tip #1, then the heat from the baking sheet will get your wings nice and crispy on the bottom.

Hot Honey Garlic Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Recipe

Hot Honey Garlic Wings – Paleo

These baked Hot Honey Garlic Wings are just as delicious as the deep-fried ones from your favourite sports bar, but they’re way healthier.

  • 2.5 lbs chicken wings
  • 1 tbsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp spicy paprika
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ¼ cup Buffalo-style hot sauce
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 2-3 cloves garlic (finely grated)
  1. Preheat oven to 425F.
  2. Pat chicken wings dry with paper towel and transfer to a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Season with onion powder, paprika and kosher salt. Toss to coat and lay flat in a single layer with a bit of space between each wing. Transfer wings to the bottom rack of the oven and cook 35-40 minutes or until golden brown and the thickest part of the wings register 165F on an instant-read digital thermometer.
  3. Meanwhile, add hot sauce, honey and garlic to a mixing bowl. Transfer cooked wings to bowl and toss to coat. Serve with dipping sauce of choice, such as my Dill Pickle Mayo.

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