Soup | Primal Gourmet https://cookprimalgourmet.com Easy and Delicious Paleo and Whole30 Recipes Thu, 09 Apr 2020 16:32:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 Minestrone Soup – Whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/minestrone-soup-whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/minestrone-soup-whole30#respond Sun, 22 Mar 2020 22:31:02 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5669 This Whole30 Minestrone Soup is an easy and delicious way to use up whatever veggies you have in the fridge and feed a crowd.

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If ever there was a time to make Minestrone Soup, it’s right now. This hearty, Italian vegetable soup is delicious, easily adaptable and ideally suited to make use of whatever you have on hand. With sold out grocery stores and the necessity to stay home, it’s imperative that we focus on maximizing what we are fortunate enough to have. #WasteNotWantNot

Minestrone Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Quarantine Pantry Recipe

Minestrone soup is incredibly healthy, easy to make, and can feed a crowd with a single pot. Not to mention the fact that it’s an excellent way to reduce waste by using up vegetables that may be going bad in your fridge. In this one, I made use of some zucchini and potato that were one day away from the compost bin, and some wilting broccoli that has seen better days. But you can definitely use things like cauliflower, eggplant, green beans, asparagus, mushrooms or even cabbage, to make your minestrone.

My minestrones are always a bit different depending on what I have. The specific recipe I’m sharing here happens to be Whole30 compliant, but you can feel free to add things like beans, chickpeas and cooked pasta to yours. For best results, I recommend using a very flavourful broth, such as my Mama’s Chicken Soup, or your favourite store-bought one.

Minestrone Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Quarantine Pantry Recipe

Minestrone Soup – Whole30

This Whole30 Minestrone Soup is an easy and delicious way to use up whatever veggies you have in the fridge and feed a crowd.

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 small carrots – diced
  • 1 small yellow onion – diced
  • 2 stalks celery – thinly sliced
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1.5 litres chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 small zucchinis – thinly sliced into half moons
  • 1 small head broccoli – roughly chopped
  • 1 large white or yellow potato (peeled and diced)
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 cups baby spinach
  • dried chili flakes (optional, for garnish)
  1. Preheat a sauté pan or stock pot over medium heat. Add oil and heat until shimmering. Add carrots, onion and celery and season with a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring, until onions are translucent, around 5 minutes. Add garlic and oregano and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.
  2. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring to coat, for 2 minutes. Add stock and stir through until combined. Add zucchini, broccoli and potato. Raise heat to high and bring soup to a gentle simmer. Add bay leaves and black pepper, lower heat to low, cover with a lid and cook 25-30 minutes or until the potatoes are fork tender.

  3. Add spinach and stir through until wilted. Taste the soup for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. Let soup cool for 10 minutes before serving in individual serving bowls and garnishing with chili flakes, if using.

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Creamy Curry Cauliflower Soup with Sausage Crumble – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/curry-cauliflower-soup-whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/curry-cauliflower-soup-whole30#comments Tue, 21 Jan 2020 16:45:39 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5440 This Whole30 Creamy Curry Cauliflower Soup with Sausage Crumble may look a little fancy, but I assure you, it’s super easy & comes together in around 30min.

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This Creamy Curry Cauliflower Soup with Sausage Crumble may look a little fancy, but I assure you, it’s super easy & comes together in around 30min. The best part? It tastes even better the next day! Chances are you won’t have leftovers because it’s that good, but you get the point.

Whole30 Creamy Cauliflower Soup Sausage Crumble Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Tossing the cauliflower in curry powder and then roasting it in the oven until golden brown and crispy imparts a significant amount of flavour here. Curry powder, contrary to popular belief, is not a singular spice, but rather is a blend of spices. If you’re like my father and claim to despise the taste of curry powder, chances are you’re not a fan of cumin, which is usually the predominant flavour in a curry powder blend. If that’s the case, you’re better off tossing the cauliflower in some coriander, chili powder, turmeric, ground ginger, and fenugreek. Of course, every curry powder is made differently so it’s a great opportunity to experiment with different flavours and proportions.

Personally, I love curry powder and think it adds a lot of dimension to this Creamy Curry Cauliflower Soup. The flavours just work for me, especially with the sausage crumble that gets spooned overtop of the finished soup. I like to use Italian sausages here because they are usually made with fennel seeds, which pair nicely with the flavours in the curry powder. But you could just as easily use any Whole30-compliant sausage you like. Lamb merguez would probably be my second choice.

Whole30 Creamy Cauliflower Soup Sausage Crumble Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

To get things extra creamy, I like to throw a Japanese yam into the soup. Not only does it add a bit of sweetness, but it thickens the soup really nicely. Regular potato can also be used if that’s what you have on hand, but yams are a great low-glycemic option.

Oh, and in case you missed it, I’ve partnered with KitchenAid to giveaway a K400 Blender! Check out the full contest details here.

Creamy Cauliflower Soup with Sausage Crumble – Whole30, Paleo

This Whole30 Creamy Curry Cauliflower Soup with Sausage Crumble may look a little fancy, but I assure you, it’s super easy & comes together in around 30min.

  • 1 head cauliflower (cut into florets)
  • Avocado oil
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt (plus extra to taste)
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper (plus extra to taste)
  • 1 medium yellow onion (diced)
  • 3 cloves garlic (smashed, left whole)
  • 1 medium Japanese yam (cubed)
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • ½ quart water
  • 4 compliant sausages (such as mild Italian, casings discarded)
  • 4 scallions (finely chopped, white & green parts separated)
  • 1 red chili pepper (such as Fresno, finely chopped)
  1. Preheat oven to 425F & line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl, combine the cauliflower, 2 tablespoons avocado oil & curry powder. Toss to coat, transfer to the prepared sheet pan and spread into a single layer. Roast in the oven until golden brown and tender, around 30 minutes.
  3. Preheat a Dutch oven or stockpot over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons avocado oil & heat until shimmering. Add onions and cook until soft and translucent, 4 minutes. Add garlic and cook 1 minute. Add chicken stock, water & yams, raise the heat to high & bring to a boil. Cover with a lid & cook until yams are fork-tender, around 12 minutes.
  4. While the yams cook, preheat 1 tablespoon avocado oil in pan over medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook until crispy & well-done. Add the white parts of the scallions & the chili pepper. Cook an additional 2 minutes. Set aside.
  5. Working in batches so as not to overfill the blender, transfer the roasted cauliflower & the soup to a blender & blend until smooth.
  6. Return the blended soup to the pot, taste for seasoning & adjust with salt & pepper as desired. Ladle into serving bowls, garnish with sausage crumble & green parts of the scallions & serve.

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/pot-pie-soup-whole30-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/pot-pie-soup-whole30-paleo#comments Fri, 29 Nov 2019 22:26:18 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5246 Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up Thanksgiving Day leftovers. It's everything you love about pot pie, but as a soup!

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up some of those Thanksgiving leftovers. It’s everything you love about a pot pie (rich, creamy, and loaded with goodness) but in the form of a soup, which saves you the cumbersome step of making a pie crust and usually ends up feeding more people.

Turkey Chicken Pot Pie Soup Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe

Don’t get me wrong, a turkey pot pie is an equally delicious way to use Thanksgiving leftovers and if that’s the path you want to take, I won’t stand in your way. In fact, I’ll even point you in the direction of this insanely delicious paleo and gluten-free Pot Pie complete with a homemade pie crust.

My guess, though, is that you’re all pie’d out from the Thanksgiving Day feast and the last thing you want to do is spend any more time in the kitchen than is absolutely necessary. Enter: Pot Pie Soup.

I should also mention that the soup is just as good with leftover roasted chicken if that’s what you have on hand. You can also feel free to use any type of vegetable you want. Chopped green beans make for a great substitute for the more traditional peas. Diced potatoes are also a very welcome addition and make the soup much heartier and chunky – both good things!

Turkey Chicken Pot Pie Soup Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe

To make things even easier than they already are, I like to use frozen vegetables. It skips the step of having to rinse and chop the vegetables. Here, I went for a mix of frozen cauliflower and broccoli, which keeps things paleo and whole30. Just keep in mind that the flavours tend to be a bit subtler when using frozen vegetables.

I hope those that celebrated Thanksgiving yesterday had a great day full of delicious food and lots of laughter!

Turkey Pot Pie Soup – Whole30, Paleo

Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up Thanksgiving Day leftovers. It's everything you love about pot pie, but as a soup!

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium carrots (peeled and diced)
  • 1 celery stalk (diced)
  • 1 yellow onion (diced)
  • Kosher salt
  • 3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 2 quarts chicken or turkey stock
  • 1 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (roughly chopped)
  • 3 cups leftover roasted turkey or chicken (cubed)
  • 2 cups frozen or fresh mixed vegetables (such as cauliflower, and broccoli)
  • Freshly-cracked black pepper
  1. Preheat a stockpot over medium-high heat. Add olive oil and heat until glistening. Add carrot, celery, and onion. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until the onions are soft and translucent. Add garlic and cook 60 seconds.
  2. Add arrowroot starch and cook, stirring, until no longer clumpy, around 2 minutes. Add the chicken or turkey stock and stir to incorporate. Add the coconut milk and bring to a simmer.

  3. Add the thyme and vegetables and stir to combine. Stir in the turkey or chicken and bring everything to a simmer. Cook the soup, uncovered, until the vegetables have softened and the flavours have come together, around 30 minutes. Taste the soup for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. Ladle into individual bowls and serve immediately.

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Whole30 Zuppa Toscana https://cookprimalgourmet.com/whole30-zuppa-toscana https://cookprimalgourmet.com/whole30-zuppa-toscana#comments Tue, 01 Oct 2019 15:44:53 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4861 Loaded with bacon, sausage, potatoes and kale, this Whole30 Zuppa Toscana is a healthy and delicious way to welcome the colder months.

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Loaded with bacon, sausage, potatoes and kale, this Whole30 Zuppa Toscana is a healthy and delicious way to welcome the colder months. Not only is it delicious and super hearty, but it’s also incredibly easy to make and will only take you a little over 30 minutes. The best part is this recipe serves 6 to 8 so you’ll likely have some leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day! And believe me when I tell you that this soup tastes even better the next day!

whole30 zuppa toscana paleo primal gourmet easy delicious soup recipe kale

You may already be familiar with Zuppa Toscana. If not, it’s a popular menu item at the Olive Garden. Many years ago, there were a few Olive Garden locations in Toronto, but they’ve long since closed down. I think I ate there once after a swim meet as a child (I swam competitively for about 7 years), but I can’t imagine having ordered anything with vegetables as a kid! Especially with pasta on the menu!

When I came across a copycat recipe for Zuppa Toscana on the ol’ Google, I had to give it a try. I mean, look at it, it’s a thing of beauty! But I really wanted to lighten it up a bit and replace the heavy cream with something Whole30-friendly.

whole30 zuppa toscana paleo primal gourmet easy delicious soup recipe kale

This Whole30 Zuppa Toscana is actually fairly similar to my Sausage, Kale and Potato Soup, but with a few minor differences. I should say that both are incredibly delicious so if you can’t decide between one and the other, just flip a coin! The Sausage Kale and Potato Soup includes additional aromatics like carrot, leeks, and celery as well as fresh herbs, like parsley and thyme. It also includes paprika for colour. It’s definitely a more robust soup and packs a bit more nutrition, which is great but can also be a bit trickier when it comes to feeding picky kids (or adults for that matter).

Whole30 Zuppa Toscana, on the other hand, is a bit simpler in terms of ingredients. There are less vegetables (a bit of an easier sell) and it looks creamy thanks to the sneaky addition of some coconut milk for colour, richness and a velvety texture. The coconut milk is a substitute for the heavy cream in the original Olive Garden recipe and keeps things Whole30-friendly.

And since I know you’ll ask, the answer is no, you can’t taste the coconut milk! Not even in the slightest! The secret is to cook and reduce the coconut milk with the onions, garlic and spices BEFORE adding the chicken stock. Reducing the coconut milk actually mellows out the flavour, as opposed to adding it at the end as you would a dairy-based cream.

If, however, you like the taste of coconut milk, you can simply add it at towards the end of the cooking process to finish the soup. You’re the boss, applesauce!

whole30 zuppa toscana paleo primal gourmet easy delicious soup recipe kale

One last note: I used sweet Italian sausages in casings because it’s very difficult to find Whole30 compliant bulk sausage meat in Toronto. Feel free to use any compliant sausage you like but I think Italian ones taste best in this soup. I also like adding fennel seeds and dried red chili flakes, which are both commonly used in Italian sausages, to bump up the flavours already present. Depending on the sausage you use, you may not need to do this. For best results, fry a small piece of sausage before making the soup and give it a taste. If you feel like it can do with a bit more fennel or chili flakes, add them individually. Otherwise, just use the sausages as they come.

Whole30 Zuppa Toscana

Loaded with bacon, sausage, potatoes and kale, this Whole30 Zuppa Toscana is a healthy and delicious way to welcome the colder months. 

  • 4 strips Whole30 compliant bacon (thinly sliced)
  • 1 pound Whole30 compliant sweet or hot Italian sausage (pork, chicken, or turkey, casings removed)
  • 1 large yellow onion (diced)
  • 4 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon dried red chili flakes (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon dried fennel seeds (optional)
  • ½ cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1.5 pounds russet potatoes (diced (substitute red or yellow potatoes))
  • 1 quart Whole30 compliant chicken stock
  • 2 bay leaves (dried or fresh)
  • 1 head Tuscan kale, thinly sliced into ribbons (also called cavolo nero, lacinato kale, dino kale or black kale)
  • kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper to taste
  1. Add bacon to a cold stock pot and set over medium-high heat. Cook the bacon, stirring regularly, until browned, about 6 minutes. Transfer the bacon to a plate lined with paper towel and set aside.
  2. Add the sausages and use a wooden or metal spoon to break them into small pieces. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the sausages are browned and cooked through, about 7 minutes. Transfer the sausage to a bowl and set aside.
  3. Discard all but 2 tablespoons of the fat in the pot. If necessary, add extra-virgin olive oil. Add the onions and cook, scraping any brown bits on the bottom of the pot, until slightly soft and translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic, chili flakes and fennel seeds, if using, and cook an additional 60 seconds. Add the coconut milk and cook until reduced by ¼ in volume, about 2 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken stock, potatoes and bay leaves. Bring the liquid to a boil, lower the heat to medium-low and cover partly with a lid. Cook until the potatoes are fork tender, about 15 minutes.
  5. Add the kale and cook until significantly wilted, about 3 minutes. If necessary, add water or chicken stock to cover. Return the cooked sausage to the pot and stir through. Let the soup simmer for 5 minutes for the flavours to come together. Taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired.
  6. Ladle the soup into individual serving bowls and garnish with the reserved bacon.

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Leftover Turkey, Sweet Potato and Kale Soup – Whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/leftover-turkey-soup https://cookprimalgourmet.com/leftover-turkey-soup#comments Fri, 23 Nov 2018 21:55:49 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4039 Make the most of your leftovers with this Leftover Turkey, Sweet Potato and Kale Soup. Quick, easy, healthy and works just as well with Turkey.

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Chances are you have some leftover turkey lying around from last night’s Thanksgiving feast. Amirite? Unless, of course, you’re Canadian like me. In which case your leftovers are long gone from our October celebrations.

Sure, you can get busy shopping for Black Friday deals and stuff all that leftover turkey meat into some sandwiches. Maybe pile on some nice slices of Havarti cheese while you’re at it? I won’t judge!

Shredded Chicken Sweet Potato Kale Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Leftovers Thanksgiving Recipe

But in the off chance you want to get back to eating clean and feeling great, this Leftover Turkey Soup with Sweet Potatoes and is just the thing you need. It’s loaded with vegetables, easy to make and super satisfying.

Truth be told, I made this one with leftover roast chicken. But that’s only because our Canadian Turkey Day was a month ago and I’m not really in the habit of roasting 20lbs turkeys on the regular.

Leftover Turkey Soup is ideal for, you guessed it… leftovers! The trick is to shred the meat into long ribbons and add it to the soup at the last minute. This allows for the meat to be quickly reheated and soak up as much of the delicious broth as possible.

The best part of this leftover turkey soup is the fact that it only takes around 30 minutes and is fully customizable. Feel free to use what you have on hand and get creative. You can start everything off by sautéing some bacon, maybe using regular potatoes or squash, and flavour with your favourite fresh or dried herbs. You’re the boss, applesauce.

Shredded Chicken Sweet Potato Kale Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Leftovers Thanksgiving Recipe

The most important thing is to follow the technique. First, sauté the aromatic vegetables (carrot, celery, leeks or onions, and garlic). Next, deglaze with stock and/or water (I like to use equal parts). Add whatever starch you’ll be using (sweet potato, potato or squash) and cook until tender. Then add any softer vegetables that don’t take long to cook (such as zucchini) and leafy greens (such as kale). Finally, add your shredded meat and taste for seasoning. Adjust with salt and pepper as required and you’re all set to serve.

By following the above steps, you’ll ensure maximum flavour and texture. For example, if you add the zucchini in with the aromatic vegetables when sautéing it will turn to mush by the time your soup is ready. Likewise, if you skip sautéing the vegetables altogether, you’ll miss out on so much extra flavour!

Leftover Turkey, Sweet Potato and Kale Soup

Make the most of your leftovers with this Leftover Turkey, Sweet Potato and Kale Soup. Quick, easy, healthy and works just as well with Turkey.

  • 2-3 medium carrots – cut into 1/2” discs
  • 2-3 celery stalks – cut into 1/2” discs
  • 1 leek – cut into 1/2” slices
  • 1 zucchini – cut into 1/4” pieces
  • 4 cups kale – finely chopped
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes – cut into 1/2” pieces
  • 4 cloves garlic – finely chopped
  • 2 cooked chicken breasts – shredded into ribbons (substitute turkey breast)
  • 1 tsp dried chili flakes (optional)
  • ¼ tsp dried thyme (substitute fresh or dried herb of choice, such as oregano or rosemary)
  • 2 bays leaves
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley – finely chopped (for garnish)
  • kosher salt and black pepper – to taste
  • 2-3 tbsp Extra Virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 1 litre chicken stock (substitute turkey stock)
  • 1 litre water
  1. Add EVOO to a stock pot or large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add carrot, celery and leeks. Season with a pinch of salt and sweat until leeks are soft and translucent (approx. 4-6 minutes). Add garlic and chili flakes and cook an additional 60 seconds.
  2. Add chicken stock, water, sweet potato, thyme and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a steady simmer, cover with a lid and cook until sweet potato is fork tender (approx. 10-12min).
  3. Add zucchini and kale and cook until zucchini has slightly softened (approx. 3-4 minutes). Add chicken and stir through. Taste for seasoning and adjust salt and pepper as required.
  4. Remove from heat, finish with parsley and ladle into individual serving bowls. Optional: finish with a drizzle of EVOO and some freshly-cracked black pepper.

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Cream of Mushroom Soup – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/cream-mushroom-soup-whole30-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/cream-mushroom-soup-whole30-paleo#comments Tue, 13 Nov 2018 21:06:50 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=3903 This Cream of Mushroom Soup is Whole30, Paleo and every bit as delicious (possibly even more so) as traditional versions loaded with heavy cream and butter.

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This Cream of Mushroom Soup is Whole30, Paleo and every bit as delicious (possibly even more so) as traditional versions loaded with heavy cream and butter.

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

The secrets to a delicious Cream of Mushroom Soup truly lie in the ingredients and technique;

Mushrooms

First and foremost, the type of mushrooms and amount you use will have a noticeable difference on the finished product. Personally, I like to use a variety because I think each mushroom brings something different to the table.

I tested this soup with all cremini, all button and a variety of cremini, button and shitake. The last assortment was the one I was happiest with in terms of flavour and colour. If I’m being honest, I only used the white button mushrooms as a filler because they are the least expensive of the bunch and allowed me to achieve a much thicker consistency.

If, however, money was no object, I’d opt for a healthy mix of cremini, shiitake, portobello, porcini and/or even chantrelles! Wild mushrooms are noticeably stronger in flavour than the prepackaged stuff you buy at the grocery store so if that’s an option and you are certain the mushrooms are safe for consumption, I say go for it!

While on the topic of money, if you want to really take this soup to the next level, try finishing each bowl with a drizzle of truffle oil just before serving. Even a tiny amount goes a really long way and compliments the mushroom flavour really nicely!

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Beef Broth

I also found that a good-quality, homemade beef broth makes a world of difference. You can make this with chicken broth as well, if desired, but the mushrooms can stand up to the stronger flavours of beef stock so you might as well go for it!

If you want to take things to the next level, try using beef bone broth. Bone broth has a much more concentrated flavour as well as added nutritional benefits. You can click here for my Beef Bone Broth recipe.

Beef broth not your thing? Try using my recipe for Chicken Bone Broth.

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Coconut Milk

Not all coconut milk is created equally so be sure to use one that you like. I recommend using a full-fat coconut milk (at least 60-70% coconut extract) rather than coconut cream because it can be reduced down and is a bit less forgiving to cook with.

Coconut milk should be made with nothing more than coconut extract and water.

Things to avoid in all coconut milks: guar gum, xanthan gum, starches, colouring, etc.

Personally, I like Arroy-D brand, which comes in tetrapaks. Also good, Savoy brand. If you are lucky enough to have a Trader Joe’s in your area, their full-fat coconut milk is about as good as it gets.

If you are in the Greater Toronto Area, Arroy-D brand can be found at certain T&Ts and Frescho locations. Savoy can be found at certain Sobeys.

Do not be fooled by “Organic” labels, which are often twice the price as regular varieties and loaded with fillers and junk.

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Technique

In terms of technique, there are actually a few things to consider:

  1. Do Not Wash Mushrooms

In general, if using whole mushrooms, do not wash them before chopping. Instead, wipe any surface dirt with a damp paper towel.

Mushrooms are like sponges and will absorb just about any liquid they come into contact with. In fact, most fresh mushrooms are already full of water anyways. Washing them will just load them even further. All of that liquid will get released into the pan during cooking and cause the mushrooms to steam, rather than brown.

Sautéing (cooking while adding colour) the mushrooms is a crucial step in developing and concentrating flavours so the last thing you want to do is prevent that from happening.

In the case of this soup, it should be noted that your mushrooms will most likely release liquid before they brown regardless of whether you wash them or not. The reason is because we are using so many mushrooms that some steaming action at the bottom of the pan is inevitable.

DO NOT DRAIN THE MUSHROOM LIQUID: As tempting as it may be to speed up the process of browning by draining any rendered water, I urge you to be patient. This water will eventually concentrate and evaporate. Not to mention the fact that you’ll also be discarding valuable olive oil and ghee.

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

  1. Reduce the Coconut Milk

Just about every Whole30 and Paleo cream-of-something-or-other-soup does not mention this step and it is truly a shame.

I assume it’s because people think coconut milk or cream are interchangeable with regular milk or cream, and I understand the confusion. Traditional Cream of Mushroom soup, for example, is finished by adding cream at the very end. However, regular cream is not nearly as strong in flavour as coconut milk and, therefore, doesn’t need to be cooked to change its flavour profile.

The question I am most frequently asked for any recipe with coconut milk is, “does it taste like coconut?” In the case of this Cream of Mushroom Soup, I’d say only a little but it’s very mild because I take the time to cook the coconut milk with the mushrooms, leeks, shallots and garlic. If I was to simply add the coconut milk at the end, I assure you the coconut flavour would overpower just about everything.

Anyone that’s ever made my Chicken with Mushroom and Tarragon Cream Sauce can vouch for the above.

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

  1. Heat the Broth Before Adding it to the Soup

 This is an optional step and you don’t have to heat the broth in a separate sauce pan before adding it to the soup, but it does save you some time since you will have to wait for the cold broth to reach a simmer before moving on to the next step.

Also, I have found that adding cold broth to hot coconut milk can sometimes cause it to separate. Heating the broth before hand does not require tempering the liquids and results in an emulsified finished product. But I think this depends a lot on the quality and fat content of the coconut milk to begin with.

Cream of Mushroom Soup Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Cream of Mushroom Soup – Whole30, Paleo

This Cream of Mushroom Soup is Whole30, Paleo and every bit as delicious (possibly even more so) as traditional versions loaded with heavy cream and butter.

  • 3 x 227gr assorted mushrooms – roughly chopped (cremini, shitake, button, or portobello)
  • 2 shallots – thinly sliced
  • 2 leeks – thinly sliced, (green tops removed)
  • 4 cloves fresh garlic – finely chopped
  • 1 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1.5 liters beef broth or beef bone broth
  • 1 tbsp fresh tarragon (substitute thyme or oregano)
  • kosher salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • 2 tbsp Extra Virgin olive oil (EVOO – plus extra, for garnish)
  • fresh chives – finely chopped (for garnish)
  • Truffle oil – optional (for garnish)
  1. Preheat a Dutch oven or stock pot over medium-high heat. Add beef broth to a separate sauce pan and set over med-low heat so that it warms up.
  2. Add EVOO, ghee, and mushrooms to the Dutch oven or stock pot. Season with a pinch of salt and sauté 12-15 minutes. Set aside 1/4 cup sautéed mushrooms for garnish. **Note: it is normal for mushrooms to release their moisture during cooking. Sauté until water has evaporated.
  3. Add shallots, leeks and another pinch of salt. Cook an additional 8-10 minutes or until leeks have softened.
  4. Add garlic and 1 tsp black pepper and cook an additional 1-2minutes.
  5. Add half of the coconut milk and stir to coat. Scrape and brown bits on the bottom of the pot. Add the remaining coconut milk and simmer until reduced in volume by half (approx. 4-5min).
  6. Add half the beef broth and stir to coat. Scrape and brown bits on the bottom of the pot. Add the remaining beef broth and tarragon and bring to a simmer.
  7. Use an immersion blender to blend soup until smooth and creamy. Alternatively, transfer soup to a traditional blender and blend until smooth and creamy.
  8. Return soup to Dutch oven and taste for seasoning. Adjust salt and pepper as required.
  9. Serve in individual bowls, garnish with sautéed mushrooms, fresh chives and a drizzle of EVOO or truffle oil.

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Instant Pot Beef Bone Broth – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/instant-pot-beef-bone-broth-whole30-paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/instant-pot-beef-bone-broth-whole30-paleo#comments Mon, 12 Nov 2018 22:55:43 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=3895 Homemade Beef Bone Broth is a wonderful addition to your daily health routine. Thanks to the Instant Pot, making a batch is easier than ever before.

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Beef bone broth is not only packed with valuable nutrients, it’s an ideal cooking liquid.

Beef bone broth can help improve skin quality, repair torn cartilage and damaged joints, fix ‘leaky gut’ syndrome, build stronger teeth, raise your immune system and improve your overall health.

I’ve touched on the differences between regular broth and bone broth before (see here), but it’s worth quickly mentioning the key points again.

It boils down (pun intended) to ingredients, cooking time and nutritional profile.

Bone broth is usually made with more bones than regular broth (or bones exclusively), it is cooked for a longer period time and, therefore, yields a more nutrient dense finished product. The increased cooking time allows for precious collagen and gelatine to release from the bones into the broth.

Beef bone broth requires the exact same cooking process as chicken bone broth (or turkey, pork, or other meats for that matter). However, when making beef bone broth, I tend to start with raw bones, as opposed to the pre-roasted ones I salvage after making my Emergency Roast Chicken, for example.

Marrow bones are ideal for making beef bone broth. They are packed with collagen and are loaded with delicious flavour. You can purchase these from your butcher or try looking through the meat freezer of a local Whole Foods, if one is in your area.

Another fantastic alternative is to use beef or veal shanks (the same cut used to make Ossobuco). Not only will you get plenty of nutrients and flavour out of the bones and cartilage, but you can also save the meat after boiling the broth and add it to a tomato sauce for a quick-and-easy ragu. Shank bones usually cost more than marrow bones but you get the added bonus of having edible meat.

Bone broth can be made on the stovetop, in a slowcooker, in a traditional pressure cooker, or in an electronic pressure cooker, such as the Instant Pot.

I prefer the Instant Pot for convenience but nothing beats the flavour of a low-and-slow braise. Therefore, if you have the time, simply follow steps 1-3 listed in the recipe below before adding everything to a stock pot or slow cooker. Then cook on the lowest heat setting for 24-72hrs. Yes, it’s a commitment. But it’s one worth making!

Instant Pot Beef Bone Broth Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy

Beef Bone Broth Golden Rules

There are two steps I think everyone should follow in order to achieve maximum flavour:

1. Blanch and Skim

Blanching (or quickly boiling) the bones in plain water will help draw out so-called impurities in the bones themselves, which float to the top as a foam or ‘scum’ and can be skimmed with a spoon.

I’ve read a wide variety of theories as to what these impurities are and whether you should bother skimming them. Personally, I skim because it’s the way my mother and grandmother taught me to do it. If you don’t skim, you’ll likely end up with a cloudy broth that isn’t as visually appealing.

As for what the impurities are, they are most likely amino acids that coagulate and rise to the surface. One reader suggested the scum arises from marrow being pulled out of the bones, but I find it hard to believe that would happen after only a few minutes of light blanching.

Clearly, I have some more research to do.

2. Thou Shalt Roast Thy Bones

If you are starting out with raw beef bones, which is most likely the case, you should definitely consider quickly roasting them in the oven before boiling, but after blanching. While you’re at it, thrown some aromatics on the tray next to them. Roasting the bones and aromatics will help develop and concentrate flavours.

Like blanching, it’s not a mandatory step but I think it makes for a much more interesting flavour profile, which is important if you’re drinking this stuff by the glass or adding it to soups and stews.

3. Apple Cider Vinegar

Almost every single bone broth recipe I’ve encountered calls for adding a splash of apple cider vinegar to the pot. Many people say the vinegar helps draw out the collagen in the bones.

Personally, I’m not convinced. My parents have been making bone broth before the invention of the internet and never added any such thing. Nevertheless, they easily made freakishly gelatinous broth.

Contrary to popular belief, I actually don’t think this is an essential ingredient for achieving a gelatinous broth. Instead, the secret seems to be using the correct bones. As mentioned, look for ones that have a lot of marrow and connective tissue!

I’m sure adding apple cider vinegar doesn’t hurt. But I’m just not a fan of the flavour it imparts. I tend to leave it out but have included it in the ingredients as optional for those who would like to try it.

Can You Freeze Mason Jars?

If you’re already going through the trouble of making beef bone broth from scratch, you might as well make as much of it as possible and freeze whatever you don’t need.

Personally, I like freezing in mason jars and ever since I shared the process of making and freezing my Chicken Bone Broth recipe on my Instagram Stories, my inbox has been flooded by readers in disbelief.

Rest assured, you can indeed freeze mason jars. HOWEVER, there are some caveats!

Homemade Chicken Bone Broth Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy

1. Let Broth Come to Room Temperature

Make sure your broth has come to room temperature before placing it in the freezer. The drastic change from a hot to cold climate will likely shatter the glass.

Note: Unless your mason jars are cold to begin with, you don’t have to wait for the broth to come to room temperature before pouring it into the jars. In fact, I recommend portioning the broth into jars immediately after cooking because it will help speed up the cooling process. The bigger the pot of hot broth, the longer it takes to cool.

2. Use Tempered Glass Jars

Tempered glass is much stronger than regular glass, which will allow it to withstand sub-zero temperatures.

I recommend these 16oz wide-mouth Ball mason jars.

They are made with tempered glass and the wide mouth is very practical. The larger tops make them more stackable, easier to pour liquid into and I can actually fit my giant hand into the jar when cleaning with a sponge.

Pro Tip: if you’re in the Greater Toronto Area, you can purchase Ball Wide-Mouth Mason Jars at Creative Bag.

3. Leave Headroom in the Jar

This is usually where things go wrong for most people!

It is imperative to leave at least a few inches of headroom in each jar. In other words, don’t fill the jars all the way up with broth. Unlike other liquids, water actually expands by about 9% when frozen and if there’s no room for it to do so, it will crack the glass. Bone Broth is, after all, made of water.

4. Defrosting

The last piece to the puzzle is using your frozen broth after it’s been frozen. To do so, simply defrost in the fridge until completely thawed. The time it takes to thaw depends on the volume of the broth. A larger jar will take longer.

I do not recommend microwaving bone broth frozen in mason jars for the simple fact that it will likely shatter. Again, a drastic change from cold to hot temperatures will crack the glass.

To speed up the process, you can try submerging the mason jar in a bowl of room temperature water. This will gradually warm up the broth in the jar. Just be sure to change the water in the bowl every so often since it will likely cool down before the broth warms up.

Instant Pot Beef Bone Broth – Whole30, Paleo

Homemade Beef Bone Broth is a wonderful addition to your daily health routine. Thanks to the Instant Pot, making a batch is easier than ever before.

  • 2-3 lbs Beef Bones – preferably with marrow
  • 2 bunches Leek Tops (the dark green parts) (- rinsed)
  • 2 medium Carrots (- rinsed)
  • 2 stalks Celery (- rinsed)
  • 1 medium Red Onion – cut in half (- rinsed)
  • 1 medium Parsnip (- rinsed)
  • 1 head fresh garlic – top trimmed (- rinsed)
  • fresh ginger root – approximately the size of your thumb (- rinsed)
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar (optional)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 small bunch fresh parsley – stems and/or leaves (- rinsed)
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  1. Fill Instant Pot halfway with water. Set to sauté mode and bring to a simmer. Add raw beef bones and blanch 15-20 minutes. Use a spoon to remove any foam that rises to the surface. Transfer blanched bones to a bowl of cold water or rinse under the faucet.

  2. Preheat oven to 450F. 

  3. Meanwhile, pat blanched bones dry with a paper towel. Add to a parchment paper-lined sheet pan or roasting tray along with the onion, carrot, parsnip, leek tops, garlic and ginger. Drizzle everything with a small amount of avocado oil. Transfer to oven and roast 15-20 minutes – flip everything halfway.

  4. Add all roasted ingredients to an empty Instant Pot along with celery, bay leaves, parsley, apple cider vinegar, salt, and pepper. Fill Instant Pot with water up until the ‘max’ line. 

  5. Set Instant Pot to Soup mode, high pressure, for 180-240 minutes (or longer). Close lid, set valve to sealing and let cook.

  6. Once cooking time has elapsed, depressurize manually or naturally.

  7. Set a fine mesh sieve overtop of a pitcher (I use my blender’s canister). Pour broth through sieve and discard everything but the liquid.
  8. To store, pour broth into tempered mason jars. Be sure to leave at least 2″ of headroom if freezing. Alternatively, freeze in large, silicon ice moulds. Once broth has frozen, transfer ice cubes to a freezer-safe bag for easy storage. Repeat process until all broth has frozen.

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Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder with Cholula https://cookprimalgourmet.com/manhattan-clam-chowder-whole30 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/manhattan-clam-chowder-whole30#comments Sun, 11 Nov 2018 16:45:29 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=3881 This Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder with Cholula Original Hot Sauce™ is super easy, comforting, and gets cooked in a single pot.

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This Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder with Cholula Original Hot Sauce™ is super easy, comforting, and gets cooked in a single pot. Aside from love, the secret ingredient to this classic soup is Cholula Original. Everything from the briny clams, sweet peppers and acidic tomatoes gets elevated with a healthy amount of the good stuff! Think of Cholula as a conductor directing a symphony of delicious flavors! This is no ordinary hot sauce and just a little goes a long way!

The first place I ever tried Manhattan Clam Chowder was, ironically, in Florida. The only reason my family went to Florida in the first place was because my grandparents retired there after living in New York for 20ish years. I was very young when they lived in Queens and we only visited them once.

I don’t remember much about it. I have vague images of concrete steps leading up to the entrance of their apartment and a long, narrow corridor once inside. That, and a piercing memory of eating wonton soup at a hole-in-the-wall, Chinese restaurant. My grandfather absolutely loved Chinese food, and soup for that matter! Funny how that’s what I’ve held on to. My food memories are always the strongest.

Manhattan Clam Chowder Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Manhattan Clam Chowder Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Manhattan Clam Chowder Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet

After they retired to south Florida, specifically Miami, we visited my grandparents often. Anywhere from two or three times a year. It was paradise. Sun, sand and long days spending time with my favorite people on earth. The entire family was ecstatic when they made the decision to become permanent snow birds. Before long it was our second home.

Perhaps the best part of their migration was getting out and exploring the Miami restaurant scene. The food was fresh, flavorful and colourful. Not to mention the grandiose portions! There was no shortage of delicious places to eat. It was heaven!

There was one restaurant, in particular, a seafood joint perched right along the Intracoastal Waterway off of NE 163rd St (near Collins Ave) that we went to quite often. It was a short 5-minute drive from my grandparent’s condo. I wish I could recall the name but I’m drawing blanks. Unfortunately, it had a short lifespan and was gone just as quick as it came. Can’t imagine why, though. The view was great, the prices were right and the seafood was fresh. The best thing on the menu? The Manhattan Clam Chowder!

I remember the first time my grandfather and I both ordered a bowl. The soup was rich, chunky, and absolutely studded with clam meat! We sat overlooking the water and ripped into the packets of saltines it came with. We took turns plunging our crackers into the steaming bowl. Dunk by dunk we soaked up the hearty soup. Seagulls along the dock eagerly waited for us to throw crumbs at them. Clearly, they didn’t know who they were dealing with!

Manhattan Clam Chowder Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet

Up until that point, my only experience with clam chowder was the New England variety. Equally delicious but different. Whereas New England clam chowder is cream-based, Manhattan clam chowder is tomato-based. They both have their merits! I guess it just depends on your mood that day.

As mentioned, this recipe for Manhattan Clam Chowder is easy, delicious, and made in a single pot. Thanks to the canned clams and jarred clam juice, it’s even more hassle-free. Of course, feel free to use fresh clams if they are available.

The secret ingredient, and the element that puts my version over the top, is the addition of Cholula Original, which kicks the soup up to a whole ‘nother level. Rather than overpowering flavors with heavy spice, Cholula Hot Sauce elevates and enhances all of the profiles in the Manhattan Clam Chowder.

Manhattan Clam Chowder Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet

This recipe for Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder is an ode to my fond memories of eating bowls of the stuff with my grandfather! I’d give anything to relive those days and every time I help myself to a bowl, it feels like he’s right there beside me.

This recipe was created in partnership with Cholula Hot Sauce™. As always, all opinions and ideas expressed are mine alone.

Manhattan Clam Chowder Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet

Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder with Cholula

This Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder with Cholula Original Hot Sauce™ is super easy, comforting, and gets cooked in a single pot. 

  • 3 strips bacon
  • 1 large white onion – diced
  • 2 large carrots – diced
  • 2 stalks celery – chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper – diced
  • 4 yellow potatoes – peeled (cubed)
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 10oz jar clam juice plus 4 jars water
  • 2 5oz cans clams – with brine
  • 1 28oz can chopped tomatoes – with juice
  • 1/3 bottle Cholula Original Hot Sauce™ – plus extra for serving
  • 1 6oz can tomato paste
  • fresh parsley – finely chopped
  • Kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper
  1. Add bacon to a large Dutch oven or stockpot. Place over medium heat and cook until bacon is crispy. Add onions, carrot, celery, and green pepper. Season with a pinch of salt and sweat vegetables until softened.
  2. Add garlic and cook 60 seconds. Add tomato paste, stir everything to combine and cook 1-2 minutes. Add clam juice, water, clam brine, tomatoes, potatoes, thyme and bay leaves. Season with ½ tsp black pepper. Note: you may use all clam juice or a combination of clam juice and water.
  3. Bring everything to a steady simmer, reduce heat to med-low, cover with a lid and cook until potatoes are fork tender.
  4. Add clam meat and cook additional 8-10 minutes for flavors to develop.
  5. Season with 1/3 bottle of Cholula Original Hot Sauce™ and ¼ cup fresh parsley. Taste and adjust salt, pepper and Cholula Original as required.
  6. Ladle into individual serving bowls and add a few more dashes of Cholula Original for a Kicked-Up Manhattan Clam Chowder!

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Homemade Bone Broth – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/homemade-bone-broth https://cookprimalgourmet.com/homemade-bone-broth#comments Mon, 05 Nov 2018 23:22:17 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=3848 Homemade Chicken Bone Broth is a wonderful addition to your daily health routine. Try drinking it on its own or using it to make delicious soups or stews.

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I’m guessing you’ve heard someone tell you that you need some bone broth in your life! Maybe it was a friend, family member, social media influencer, random stranger, bone broth brand, or even your naturopath.

They’ve likely claimed that bone broth can improve skin quality, repair torn cartilage and damaged joints, fix a ‘leaky gut’, build stronger teeth, raise your immune system, and is great for your overall health. Better yet, they’ve called it the ‘fountain of youth’ or ‘liquid gold’.

Truth is, they’re probably right!

Bone broth is rich in protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, collagen and gelatin. The last two aspects are what really set it apart from regular broth.

Nevertheless, you sat there scratching your head trying to figure out why the Starbucks barista was trying to convince you to drink stinky cups of soup for breakfast!

Homemade Chicken Bone Broth Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy

What is Bone Broth and How is it Different from Regular Broth?

Ever wondered what the difference is between bone broth and regular broth? Rest assured, you’re not alone. On paper, it can all get a bit jumbled so I’ll do my best not to add to the confusion.

Though bone broth and regular broth are very similar, there are a few things that tend to set them apart.

  1. Ingredients

Bone broth and regular broth are made with nearly identical ingredients. Everything used to make bone broth can also be used to make regular broth.

The differences might lie in the larger amount of bones used to make bone broth and the fact that the bones are often roasted beforehand.

Roasting the bones is not absolutely necessary, but it will yield a broth with a more concentrated flavour. Here again, roasted bones can also be used to make regular broth.

  1. Cooking Time

The length of time the broth cooks for is the deciding factor and separates bone broth from regular broth. The larger the bones, the longer the cooking time.

Bone broth needs to cook for much longer than regular broth because the bones need to have a chance to break down and release their nutrients into the liquid.

Beef bones, for example, are much thicker than chicken bones and require longer to breakdown. This is especially true if cooking over low heat, which is your best option when cooking on the stovetop or in a slow cooker. Some recipes call for cooking the broth for upwards of 24-72 hours. After all, the last thing you want to do is leave your stovetop on full blast throughout the night.

Using a stovetop or electronic pressure cooker, such as the Instant Pot, will significantly speed up the process. My chicken bone broth, for example, takes on 3 hours to cook over high pressure.

If you plan on making bone broth at home on the stovetop or in a slow cooker, it is important not to rush the cooking time since this is where the magic happens. The longer the bones have a chance to cook, the more likely you will extract their coveted collagen.

  1. Nutritional Profile

In addition to the nutritional benefits provided by the vegetables and aromatics, bone broth has the added benefit of being rich in naturally-sourced collagen and gelatin.

Collagen in particular is terrific for:

  • improving skin quality
  • repairing torn cartilage and damaged joints
  • fixing ‘leaky gut’ syndrome
  • building stronger teeth
  • raising your immune system
  • improving your overall health

But don’t take my word for it. Read more about the benefits of bone broth and collagen here.

Homemade Chicken Bone Broth Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy

 How to Make Chicken Bone Broth

The below is less a recipe then a set of guidelines since I make my bone broth almost exclusively with scraps, which are hard to measure unless weighed.

A few years ago I got into the habit of making freezer ‘broth bags’ to collect and store odd bits of scraps that can be used to make homemade broth and bone broth.

Things I put into my broth bag:

  • leftover chicken carcasses (raw or roasted)
  • onion peels
  • odd garlic cloves
  • odd pieces of fresh ginger
  • carrot peels, tips and tops
  • celery stems and tips
  • herb stems (such as parsley or dill)
  • full vegetables that are starting to turn (such as soft carrots and celery)

Homemade Chicken Bone Broth Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy

When it comes time to make bone broth or stock, I simply dump all the contents of the bag into a pot, fill with water, add salt, pepper and bay leaves, and cook. It helps reduce waste and makes for an easy process.

Since measurements are never precise, the bone broth always tastes a little bit different, which I don’t mind.

If making bone broth, I discard everything but the liquid since I have made the broth using scraps to begin with. If, on the other hand, I don’t have any scraps but have a fridge full of fresh produce, I’d likely make my Mama’s Chicken Soup. Though, here again, scraps can be used.

One thing I do like to add to my bone broth is Chayote Squash, which is a secret ingredient my mother uses in her soup. It adds a subtle sweetness to the broth and is rich in vitamin C.

Notes:

The same method and ingredients can be used to make beef bone broth, though the cooking time should be increased to account for the larger bones.

If cooking on the stovetop, set pot over lowest heat on a back burner and cook for 24 hours.

If cooking in a slow cooker, cook over low heat for 24 hours.

Homemade Chicken Bone Broth – Whole30, Paleo

Homemade Chicken Bone Broth is a wonderful addition to your daily health routine. Try drinking it on its own or using it to make delicious soups or stews.

  • 1.5-2 lbs assorted Chicken bones – previously roasted or raw
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Onion
  • 1 Chayote Squash
  • parsnips
  • garlic cloves
  • fresh ginger root
  • 3 bay leaves
  • fresh parsley – stems and/or leaves
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  1. Add all ingredients to Instant Pot. Add water up until the ‘max’ line. Set to sauté function and bring to a simmer. Use a spoon to discard any foam that rises to the surface of the water.
  2. Cancel sauté function and switch to Soup mode, high pressure, for 180 minutes. Close lid, set valve to sealing and let cook.
  3. One cooking time has elapsed, depressurize manually or naturally.
  4. Set a fine mesh sieve overtop of a pitcher (I use my blender’s canister). Pour broth through sieve and discard everything but the liquid.
  5. To store, pour broth into tempered mason jars.
  6. Notes: If freezing, leave 1.5-2” of headroom at the top of each jar to prevent them from bursting. Alternatively, freeze in large, silicon ice moulds. Once broth has frozen, transfer ice cubes to a freezer-safe bag for easy storage. Repeat process until all broth has frozen.

 

 

 

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Mama’s Chicken Soup – Whole30, Paleo https://cookprimalgourmet.com/mamas-chicken-soup https://cookprimalgourmet.com/mamas-chicken-soup#comments Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:44:06 +0000 https://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=3816 This is my Mama's Chicken Soup Recipe (AKA Jewish Penicillin). It will cure any ailment under the sun, including a broken heart.

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This is my Mama’s Chicken Soup (AKA Jewish Penicillin). It is the best chicken soup in the entire world. It can and will cure any ailment under the sun, including a broken heart. This isn’t up for debate. This is fact. It is science. It is Math. 1+1= Mama’s Chicken Soup! Are we clear?

Mama's Chicken Soup Jewish Penicillin Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Ronny Joseph Easy How To

Growing up, my mother made Chicken Soup at least once a week. We ate it so often that at one point I never wanted to see it again. In addition to meeting her weekly Chicken Soup quota, she also made it (and continues to do so) on every single holiday – Jewish or otherwise. I would know it’s a holiday when I saw that she used the Chicken Soup as a base to make her Matzo Ball soup (something I will never get tired of!).

The recipe I’m sharing below is a codified version of something that is intangible. Chicken Soup, my Mama’s included, is an organic, living thing. It changes a little bit every time and doesn’t need to be made by following any specific measurements.

Chicken Soup is something you can feel your way through and improvisation is a part of the process. It is the Jazz music of the culinary world.

Of course, this is not something that comes easily to everyone. It takes practice and a great deal of trial and error. I have probably tried to recreate my Mama’s Chicken Soup no less than 2 dozen times and it still doesn’t hold a candle to hers. What can I say? She has that touch!

But, that shouldn’t stop anyone, myself included, from trying! I’m happy to say that with the below recipe, you can come very close to tasting a big part of my childhood.

Mama's Chicken Soup Jewish Penicillin Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Ronny Joseph Easy How To

But you might need a few of Mama’s Chicken Soup pointers to help you along the way:

  1. Raw vs Roasted

You don’t have to use raw chicken quarters. You can use a roasted chicken carcass. Roasted bones have a concentrated flavour that gets released into the broth as it slowly cooks. It’s also a great way to reduce waste!

  1. Fresh vs Scraps

Likewise, using whole, fresh, beautiful produce to make the stock is a waste of money. Instead, you should be using vegetable scraps saved from other recipes you make throughout the week. I keep a ‘stock bag’ in the freezer for precisely this purpose. I continuously add to it every time I peel an onion or carrot, trim celery or have odd cloves of garlic.

However, it is virtually impossible for me to quantify carrot trimmings and onion peels. It’s also very hard for me to explain how to cook without a recipe.

Therefore, I recommend sticking to the ingredients and measurements below so that you have a reference point.

Mama's Chicken Soup Jewish Penicillin Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Ronny Joseph Easy How To

  1. Stock vs Soup

My Mama’s Chicken Soup is, for all intents and purposes, a recipe for making stock. The only difference is that the we usually treat the stock as a meal in itself.

When making with raw chicken, we shred the poached meat and eat it with the flavourful broth.

If using roasted bones, we use the liquid as stock for other things.

You can use it however you please. It will undoubtedly make everything taste better.

  1. Use Kosher or Halal Chicken:

If you are going to use raw chicken parts, such as legs and thighs, or even an entire bird, I recommend purchasing Kosher or Halal. Unlike non-religious butchering practices, one of the requirements in both Kosher and Halal laws is for the blood to be drained from the animal.

Religious considerations aside, this will result in a less cloudy stock. Not to mention the fact that the animals must be slaughtered in a humane way or the meat is considered inedible.

If, however, you are using the bones or carcass of a roasted bird, this is less of a concern since most of the blood will have been cooked and/or drained after carving. On the other hand, many roasted chickens are first seasoned or marinated in any number of spices, etc., and these will inevitably colour your stock.

I once made stock from the remains of my Cajun Roast Chicken. While incredibly delicious, the stock was noticeably darker and more red than usual.

  1. Clean vs Cloudy

A cloudy stock occurs when you do not skim the foam that rises to the surface of the water when boiling the meat. The foam is the result of solidified impurities in the meat.

Personally, I don’t get too fussy with how clear my soup/stock looks. I do my best to skim as much foam as possible but if there are flecks floating around, all the better, I say! More flavour!

But if you want a less cloudy finished product, you can try one of the following techniques:

  1. Simmer the chicken on its own in water for 10 minutes. Skim any foam that rises to the surface before adding in all of your vegetables and aromatics. One thing I’ve noticed is that while adding everything at once results in a more flavourful broth, the vegetables and herbs trap some of the foam and make it harder to skim, which later solidifies and lingers in the stock.
  2. Follow the recipe below, as outlined, but transfer the the remaining stock through a fine-meshed sieve or cheesecloth. This will ensure maximum flavour and a cleaner finished product.

Mama's Chicken Soup Jewish Penicillin Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Ronny Joseph Easy How To

  1.  Keep the Schmaltz

Although you should skim any foam that rises to the surface, you should definitely leave the fat globules. Those beautiful, shiny bubbles that dance across the surface of your soup are rendered chicken fat (AKA Schmaltz). This is the holy grail of Jewish delicacies and is pure, unadulterated flavour!

You will notice significantly more schmaltz when using raw chicken that is skin-on, since this is where most of the chicken fat is stored.

Thus, there is a case to be made for using raw chicken as opposed to roasted bones.

Mama's Chicken Soup Jewish Penicillin Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Ronny Joseph Easy How To Mama's Chicken Soup Jewish Penicillin Whole30 Paleo Primal Gourmet Ronny Joseph Easy How To

Mama's Chicken Soup

This is my Mama’s Chicken Soup Recipe (AKA Jewish Penicillin). It will cure any ailment under the sun, including a broken heart.

  • 4 chicken legs – preferably Halal or Kosher
  • 2 celery stalks – cut in half
  • 2 yellow onions – unpeeled
  • 2 large carrots – cut in half; plus 2 more – peeled and cut into discs
  • 1 parsnip – cut in half
  • 1 chayote squash – cut in half
  • 1 knob ginger – roughly the size of your thumb
  • 1 head garlic – stem trimmed
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 small bunch fresh dill – plus extra for garnish
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns
  1. Add all ingredients to a 7.5qt stockpot or Dutch oven. Add enough water to reach the brim of the pot.
  2. Set over medium heat and bring to a gentle simmer. Cook, uncovered, for a total of 75 minutes and use a spoon to scrape any foam that rises to the surface of the water.
  3. Use a large, slotted spoon or wire strainer to remove the vegetables. These are edible but I am not a fan of the texture so I discard.
  4. Transfer chicken to a tray and let cool. Use your hands or a set of forks to shred the meat from the bone. Discard bones, skin and cartilage. Reserve meat and set aside.
  5. While the chicken cools, add sliced carrots and cook until fork-tender (approximately 10-12 minutes).
  6. Return shredded chicken to pot. Taste soup for seasoning and adjust salt as required.
  7. Serve in individual bowls. Garnish with fresh dill and freshly-cracked black pepper.

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