Primal Gourmet http://cookprimalgourmet.com Easy and Delicious Paleo and Whole30 Recipes Fri, 06 Dec 2019 00:03:08 -0500 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 Smoked Chicken Wings – Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-chicken-wings-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-chicken-wings-paleo#respond Fri, 06 Dec 2019 00:03:08 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5260

These Smoked Chicken Wings are sweet, spicy, crispy and loaded with wood-fired flavour. Try serving with homemade Alabama White BBQ Sauce for dipping.

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I cooked up 4 pounds of smoked chicken wings last night on my Traeger but didn’t get a chance to snap a photo before the sun went down at 5pm. So, today, I did what any reasonable human being would do and cooked another 4 pounds. I also made another batch of Alabama White BBQ sauce for dipping, because consistency is key.

Smoked Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Traeger Recipes

If you’ve never tried smoked chicken wings, you’re seriously missing out. They’ve got to be my absolute favourite way to cook wings. They also happen to be one of the easiest. You get amazing, wood-fired flavour from the Traeger, and thanks to an easy homemade spice rub, the wings are sweet, spicy and incredibly delicious.

The wings themselves are Paleo friendly. I use coconut sugar in the spice rub instead of the more traditional brown sugar found in most store-bought varieties. You get a similar sweet and sticky finish on the wings without the spike in your blood sugar.

While the smoked chicken wings cooked, I threw together a super easy and delicious Alabama White BBQ Sauce. The sauce is actually Whole30 compliant and goes great with roasted chicken as well. It’s creamy and has a lot of twang from the apple cider vinegar and prepared horseradish, which are the perfect balance for the sweet coconut sugar in the spice rub. This stuff is addictive so I recommend making a double batch.

I’m often asked to share tips and tricks for cooking on a Traeger so here are two steps I take to get

the best smoked chicken wings:

Smoked Chicken Wings Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Traeger Recipes

Use a Binder:

Rubbing the wings in a bit of hot sauce not only imparts a bit of flavour, but it also works as a binder that will help the spice rub to stick to the wings. Mustard is another common binder amongst the barbecue community.

You can probably get away without using a binder on the wings, but keep in mind that smoke is water soluble so the moisture in the hot sauce will also help absorb some of the smokey flavour from the grill.

Smoke First, Grill Later:

I like to start off by cooking my wings at 165F for 30 minutes. This gives the wings a good amount of smoke flavour without cooking them through. I’ve also tried this step at 225F, but find that you don’t get quite the same amount of smoke flavour at the higher heat. Then, to finish cooking the smoked chicken wings and get the skin nice and crispy, I crank the heat up to 425F for another 30 to 35 minutes or until they’re around 175F internally.

 

See here for Alabama White BBQ Sauce recipe

Smoked Chicken Wings – Paleo

These Smoked Chicken Wings are sweet, spicy, crispy and loaded with wood-fired flavour. Try serving with homemade Alabama White BBQ Sauce for dipping.

  • 2  tbsp  coconut sugar
  • 1  tbsp  onion powder
  • 1  tbsp  garlic powder
  • 1  tbsp  paprika
  • 2  tsp  kosher salt
  • 1  tsp  cayenne pepper
  • 4 pounds free-range ( organic split, chicken wings)
  • 1 tablespoon hot sauce of choice – I used Cholula original
  • 1 <wprm-code>recipe Alabama White BBQ Sauce</wprm-code>
  1. Run the start-up cycle on your Traeger and preheat the grill to 165F.
  2. In a bowl, combine the coconut sugar, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, salt and cayenne pepper. Stir until combined and set aside.
  3. Pat the wings dry with paper towel and add them to a large bowl. Pour in the hot sauce and toss the wings to coat. Lay the wings out in a single layer on a large sheet pan. Liberally and evenly season both sides of the chicken wings. If there is leftover spice rub, place in a sealable jar and store at room temperature for up to 30 days.
  4. Transfer the wings directly onto the preheated grill. Close the lid and smoke at 225F for 30 min.
  5. Raise the heat to 425F and cook the wings until deeply browned and crispy, or until 175F internally.
  6. Transfer the smoked chicken wings to a serving platter and serve with the Alabama White BBQ sauce.

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup – Whole30, Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/pot-pie-soup-whole30-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/pot-pie-soup-whole30-paleo#respond Fri, 29 Nov 2019 22:26:18 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5246

Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up Thanksgiving Day leftovers. It's everything you love about pot pie, but as a soup!

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up some of those Thanksgiving leftovers. It’s everything you love about a pot pie (rich, creamy, and loaded with goodness) but in the form of a soup, which saves you the cumbersome step of making a pie crust and usually ends up feeding more people.

Turkey Chicken Pot Pie Soup Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe

Don’t get me wrong, a turkey pot pie is an equally delicious way to use Thanksgiving leftovers and if that’s the path you want to take, I won’t stand in your way. In fact, I’ll even point you in the direction of this insanely delicious paleo and gluten-free Pot Pie complete with a homemade pie crust.

My guess, though, is that you’re all pie’d out from the Thanksgiving Day feast and the last thing you want to do is spend any more time in the kitchen than is absolutely necessary. Enter: Pot Pie Soup.

I should also mention that the soup is just as good with leftover roasted chicken if that’s what you have on hand. You can also feel free to use any type of vegetable you want. Chopped green beans make for a great substitute for the more traditional peas. Diced potatoes are also a very welcome addition and make the soup much heartier and chunky – both good things!

Turkey Chicken Pot Pie Soup Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe

To make things even easier than they already are, I like to use frozen vegetables. It skips the step of having to rinse and chop the vegetables. Here, I went for a mix of frozen cauliflower and broccoli, which keeps things paleo and whole30. Just keep in mind that the flavours tend to be a bit subtler when using frozen vegetables.

I hope those that celebrated Thanksgiving yesterday had a great day full of delicious food and lots of laughter!

Turkey Pot Pie Soup – Whole30, Paleo

Turkey Pot Pie Soup is an easy, delicious and healthy way to use up Thanksgiving Day leftovers. It's everything you love about pot pie, but as a soup!

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium carrots (peeled and diced)
  • 1 celery stalk (diced)
  • 1 yellow onion (diced)
  • Kosher salt
  • 3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 2 quarts chicken or turkey stock
  • 1 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (roughly chopped)
  • 3 cups leftover roasted turkey or chicken (cubed)
  • 2 cups frozen or fresh mixed vegetables (such as cauliflower, and broccoli)
  • Freshly-cracked black pepper
  1. Preheat a stockpot over medium-high heat. Add olive oil and heat until glistening. Add carrot, celery, and onion. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until the onions are soft and translucent. Add garlic and cook 60 seconds.
  2. Add arrowroot starch and cook, stirring, until no longer clumpy, around 2 minutes. Add the chicken or turkey stock and stir to incorporate. Add the coconut milk and bring to a simmer.

  3. Add the thyme and vegetables and stir to combine. Stir in the turkey or chicken and bring everything to a simmer. Cook the soup, uncovered, until the vegetables have softened and the flavours have come together, around 30 minutes. Taste the soup for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. Ladle into individual bowls and serve immediately.

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Turkey Gravy – Gluten-Free, Paleo, Whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/turkey-gravy-gluten-free-paleo-whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/turkey-gravy-gluten-free-paleo-whole30#respond Thu, 28 Nov 2019 17:44:02 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5237

A Turkey Gravy so rich, delicious and satisfying that you would never believe it's gluten-free, paleo and Whole30. It's a must at Thanksgiving of Christmas!

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A Turkey Gravy so rich, delicious and satisfying that you would never believe it’s gluten-free, paleo and Whole30. It’s a must at Thanksgiving or Christmas!

You can most definitely use a homemade turkey stock here. In fact, it’s ideal in terms of flavour and reducing waste. But in the off chance that you just couldn’t find the time, using a packaged turkey bone broth, like the one from organic one from Thrive Market, is a lifesaver. It’s super healthy, made from all-natural ingredients, free of sugars or junky fillers, and tastes really great when transformed into a turkey gravy.

Here, I’m sharing a gravy that is every bit as good as the one your granny made from scratch. It also just so happens to be gluten-free, paleo and Whole30 compliant thanks to the ghee and arrowroot starch.

This grain-free, natural thickener works similar to corn starch and is perfect for making a roux, a thickener that usually consists of frying equal parts fat with flour. Unlike regular flour though, arrowroot starch doesn’t need to be toasted for too long because it’s neutral in flavour.

Can This Turkey Gravy Be Made Ahead of Time?

Seeing as how I’m publishing this recipe on Thanksgiving Day (sorry, I was getting over a cold), this answer probably won’t help you much right now. But in the chance that you wan’t to prepare it in the future or for Christmas, I can tell you that the gravy can be made up to one day in advance.

If making the gravy ahead of time, I recommend reducing it halfway at first. Then, when reheating, continue to reduce it to your desired consistency. This way, you don’t run the risk of having it become to thick when reheating it before serving.

Turkey Gravy Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Gluten-Free Recipe

Turkey Gravy – Gluten-Free, Paleo, Whole30

A Turkey Gravy so rich, delicious and satisfying that you would never believe it's gluten-free, paleo and Whole30. It's a must at Thanksgiving or Christmas!

  • 2 tablespoons ghee or grass-fed butter
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 16.9 fl ounce Thrive Market Organic Turkey Bone Broth
  • roast turkey pan drippings (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt (plus more to taste)
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper (plus more to taste)
  1. Pour bone broth into a sauce pan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat.
  2. Meanwhile, add ghee or butter to a separate sauce pan over medium heat. Once the butter has melted, sprinkle in the arrowroot starch and whisk until smooth and no longer clumpy to form a roux, about 2 minutes.
  3. Whisking continuously, slowly pour the hot bone broth into the roux ¼ cup at a time. It’s important to do this gradually to avoid clumps in your gravy. If using pan drippings, add them now. Once fully incorporated and smooth, season the gravy with salt and pepper.

  4. Bring the gravy to a gentle simmer over medium heat and cook, whisking occasionally, until reduced in volume by two-thirds or more depending on how thick you like it. Taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired.
  5. Transfer the gravy to a gravy boat and serve immediately.

This gravy can be made up to one day in advance. If making the gravy ahead of time, I recommend reducing it halfway at first. Then, when reheating, continue to reduce it to your desired consistency. This way, you don’t run the risk of having it become to thick when reheating it before serving.

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Smoked Turkey Recipe – Paleo, Whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-turkey-recipe-paleo-whole30 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/smoked-turkey-recipe-paleo-whole30#respond Thu, 21 Nov 2019 23:30:30 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5220

Smoked Turkey isn't just an incredibly delicious way to prepare Thanksgiving Dinner, it also might be the easist. Try this method and be sure to dry brine!

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Smoked Turkey is actually the only way I like my turkey and for the past three years it has been my go-to method when it comes to celebrating Thanksgiving. I love the smokey flavours, it’s extremely easy to do on my Traeger Grill, and the turkey always comes out so incredibly juicy. To maximize the flavour of my turkey, I always do two things: I brine the bird and I smother it with a compound “butter” (I normally use ghee), made with lots of fresh herbs.

Smoked Turkey Recipe Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Thanksgiving Day Easy

No matter how you decide to cook your Thanksgiving turkey, you should absolutely brine it. This shouldn’t even be a point of discussion. Brine your turkeys, end of story. It results in a far less dry finished product and makes the turkey much more flavourful.

You can do this two ways: go with a regular brine, which is essentially a salt water solution, or use a dry brine, which basically means you salt the turkey for an extended period of time and leave it uncovered in the fridge. Wet brines and dry brines each have their pros and cons. I tend to prefer dry brines for a few reasons, which I’ll briefly explain below.

Why You Should Brine: Smoked Turkey or Otherwise

Because I am very much a simpleton when it comes to science, I really like Alton Brown’s explanation for why you should brine your turkey. In an nutshell, you can think of brining like taking out an insurance policy that will prevent your turkey from drying out. Through a process of osmosis (which I won’t pretend to actually know anything about), moisture in the bird is pulled out into the brine and then pushed back in.

The end result is a much more moist finished product because (if I understand this correctly, which I probably don’t) you are essentially hydrating the muscular tissue of the turkey. So, as the turkey cooks and inevitably releases moisture, it doesn’t dry out. At the same time, you’re also seasoning the deeper parts of the flesh with the salt in the brine. Moreover, if you are adding herbs, spices and aromatics to your brine, those flavours are also going to marinade the turkey.

Smoked Turkey Recipe Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Thanksgiving Day Easy

Wet Brines vs. Dry Brines

Wet brines are great for the above reasons, but for an 18 to 20-pound turkey you’re going to need two things: a big enough food-safe bucket to fully submerge the turkey in its brine, and somewhere to keep it cold until it’s ready to cook (usually 24 hours later.) Most refrigerators, especially ones that are full with other foods necessary for Thanksgiving, won’t accommodate the space needed for such a big bucket. Let alone tiny apartment fridges like the one I had for a year while living in a condo.

It is possible to brine a turkey in a large cooler, but to do this you’ll need to keep a watchful eye on the temperature of the brine, adjusting it with ice every so often to ensure it does not drop below a food-safe temperature. This tends to be quite a bit of work and can get messy when trying to discard the water after brining.

Dry brines, as the name suggests, do not involve any liquid. Instead, it simply means that the turkey (or any other protein your using) is salted for an extended period of time. Like a wet brine, you can incorporate different herbs, spices and flavourings into your dry brine to a similar effect. The salt on the surface of the turkey will pull moisture out from the bird and then push it back in through a process osmosis. Like a wet brine, a dry brine keeps the turkey moist and prevents it from drying out, and it also seasons the meat more deeply and evenly.

The downside is it doesn’t necessarily do as good of a job as a wet brine because you are relying solely on the available moisture already present in the turkey. Nevertheless, I can tell you from personal experience that a dry brined turkey is really, really delicious. Especially when you’re going for smoked turkey. So, even if you can’t accommodate a wet brine, you should absolutely dry brine your turkey.

Smoked vs Roasted Turkey?

The answer here is a simple one for me: smoked. All the way. Smoking doesn’t just impart flavour, I find it to deliver a much juicier finished product.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, there is no better product on the market than a Traeger Grill when it comes to smoking. Not only does it deliver incredible wood-fired flavour, it is the easiest grill I’ve ever operated. Let me put it to you this way, if you know how to use an oven, you can master a Traeger.

I’ll have to do a more in-depth article on it, but in a nutshell a Traeger works just like a convection oven in that it uses indirect heat and circulated air to cook food. The difference is that Traeger operate on a combination of electric power and 100% all-natural, food grade pellets that deliver an incredible wood-fired flavour.

Smoked Turkey Recipe Paleo Whole30 Primal Gourmet Thanksgiving Day Easy

Smoked Turkey and Compound Butter Go Together Like Peanut Butter and Jelly

I think I picked up this trick from a Tyler Florence recipe years ago. To be honest, I can’t remember. But it involves using your hand to create a pocket between the skin of the turkey and the breast meat. This then allows you to stuff the pocket with a compound butter made with plenty of fresh herbs, like rosemary, sage, thyme and parsley.

As the turkey cooks, the compound butter melts down and flavours the breast meat, which is the most likely part of the meat to dry out. Just like the brine, this compound butter acts as a kind of insurance policy to prevent the turkey from becoming dry.

To Spatchcock or Not to Spatchcock?

Here again, my answer is simple: spatchcock, without a doubt. Spatchcocking, meaning to butterfly the bird and remove the backbone, does three things: it allows the bird to cook more evenly, it decreases the amount of time it takes to cook the bird, and it exposes more of the skin, which can then get more crispy as it cooks. Not to mention the fact that it’s actually much easier to carve a spatchcocked turkey than one that is cooke whole.

I also like to spatchcock my turkey because, as mentioned, I usually dry brine my bird so I need to be able to refrigerate it. Butterflying the turkey and laying it flat makes it much easier to do so.

For all of these reasons, you should spatchcock your turkey, smoked or otherwise.

Smoked Turkey Recipe – Paleo, Whole30

Smoked Turkey isn't just an incredibly delicious way to prepare Thanksgiving Dinner, it also might be the easist. Try this method and be sure to dry brine!

  • 1 18 to 20- pound turkey (preferably free-range, organic and humanely raised)
  • 2.5 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1.5 teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • ¾ cup room temperature ghee or grass-fed butter
  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh (rosemary plus extra for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh (thyme plus extra for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh (sage, plus extra for garnish)
  1. Using a sharp knife or pair of kitchen shears, remove the backbone of the turkey and refrigerate it to make homemade turkey stock later. With the turkey breast side-down, make an incision in the back of the breast bone. Flip the turkey so that it is breast side-up and press down on the breasts to flatten it. Being careful not to pierce the skin, use your hands to separate the skin from the breast, creating a pocket of air. Pat the turkey very dry with paper towel.

  2. Combine the salt and pepper in a small bowl. Season the bird generously all over with the salt and pepper.

  3. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a wire rack. Lay the turkey flat on the wire rack, breast side-up, and refrigerate, uncovered, for 24 hours.
  4. Remove the turkey from the fridge 1 hour before cooking to let it come to room temperature. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the ghee, parsley, rosemary, thyme, and sage. Mix until incorporated.
  5. The turkey should be dry at this point but if there is any surface moisture, pat it dry with a paper towel. Using your hands, stuff the pocket between the breast meat and skin with the compound butter.
  6. Set the Traeger to 225F and preheat with the lid closed for 15 minutes.

  7. Set the wire rack over a 4-inch-deep roasting dish and set the turkey on top, breast side-up. Close the lid and smoke the turkey until the thickest part of the breast reaches an internal temperature of 100 to 110F, 2 to 2.5 hours. Take into account temperature fluctuations due to ambient weather.

  8. Raise the temperature to 375F and cook the turkey, basting it with any rendered juices twice or three times, until the thickest part of the breast reaches 160F, 1 to 1.5 hours. Transfer the cooked turkey to a carving board and loosely tent with foil. Let the turkey rest for at least 20 minutes before carving.

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Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash http://cookprimalgourmet.com/sweet-sour-roasted-squash http://cookprimalgourmet.com/sweet-sour-roasted-squash#respond Tue, 19 Nov 2019 23:46:20 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5208

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash may not be the first thing you think of when it comes to Thanksgiving Day side dishes, but trust me, it works!

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Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash is an incredibly easy side dish that is as beautiful as it is delicious. As the name suggests, it’s sweet, sour and even a little bit spicy thanks to the addition of some Aleppo pepper. To finish the dish, I like to add some toasted pecans for some added crunch. The play of flavours and textures is incredible.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes To Make

The play of sweet and sour comes from an easy agrodolce sauce. Sounds fancy, but it’s really just a combination of sugar and vinegar. To keep things Paleo, I like to use a natural sweetener, such as pure maple syrup or honey. The taste is incredible so I see no reason to not use a healthier option here. It’s also very versatile and makes an amazing glaze for grilled meats, like these pork chops.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes To Make

There are two important tips when it comes to making delicious roasted squash. The first is to space them out on the baking sheet with one of the cut sides. Giving them enough room to “breathe” will result in a deeper caramelization, which is a good thing. Placing them with one of the cut sides down allows for contact to be made with the baking sheet, which actually helps brown the squash.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes To Make

The other tip is to cook the squash undisturbed. Most recipes call for flipping squash halfway. So, for example, if you cook the squash for 50 minutes total, you’re asked to flip at the 25 minute mark. I actually find this to result in a less caramelized, and less delicious, roasted squash. Instead, I let the squash roast for 40 minutes before flipping it and glazing it with the agrodolce sauce. This way, the squash has enough time to develop a deep and delicious crust on at least one side.

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash

Sweet and Sour Roasted Squash may not be the first thing you think of when it comes to Thanksgiving Day side dishes, but trust me, it works!

  • 1 acorn squash (seeded and cut into 2-inch-thick wedges)
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 1/4  cup  white wine vinegar
  • 1/4  cup  maple syrup
  • 1/4  cup  Extra Virgin olive oil EVOO
  • 6 springs fresh thyme (tied together with butcher’s twine)
  • 2  cloves  garlic – smashed
  • ½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper flakes
  • ¼ cup unsalted pecans (toasted and roughly chopped)
  1. Preheat the oven to 400F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl, combine the squash, avocado oil, salt and pepper and toss to coat. Arrange the squash on the prepared baking sheet in a single layer, cut side-down. Do not overcrowd the pan.
  3. Roast the squash for 40 minutes, undisturbed, or until the bottom of each wedge is golden brown and the centers can easily be pierced with a fork.
  4. Meanwhile, add the vinegar, maple syrup, olive oil, garlic and thyme to a cold, 2-quart sauce pan. Set the pan over medium-low heat and gently cook the sauce, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced in volume by 1/4, approximately 12 minutes. Discard the garlic and thyme and set the sauce aside.
  5. Flip the squash wedges, drizzle with ¼ of the sauce and return it to the oven to allow the sauce to caramelize, 8 to 10 minutes.
  6. Arrange the squash on a serving platter. Drizzle with the remaining sauce and season with the Aleppo pepper. Garnish with the pecans and serve immediately.

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Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie http://cookprimalgourmet.com/gluten-free-pumpkin-pie http://cookprimalgourmet.com/gluten-free-pumpkin-pie#comments Sun, 17 Nov 2019 16:03:32 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=1345

With an easy-to-make, perfectly flaky crust and rich, delicious filling, this Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie will satisfy even the pickiest of eaters!

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With an easy-to-make, perfectly flaky crust and rich, delicious filling, this Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie will satisfy even the pickiest of eaters! It’s so good that my guess is it will not only be a hit at your Thanksgiving dinner, but will also continue to make an appearance on your table year round. My wife says, “this pie is a whole mood.” I have no idea what that means, but I think it’s a good thing.

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Dessert Recipe

This is actually an updated version of a recipe I shared way back in October of 2016! In that version I used a pie crust based on the one from FoodRepublic.com, originally developed by Lea Valle, author of the cookbook Sweet Paleo: Gluten Free, Grain-Free Desserts, but replaced the butter/palm oil/lard she called for with ghee.

If I’m being honest, the old pie crust was very good, but it wasn’t the best. It was a combination of almond flour, coconut flour and arrowroot starch. It was tasty, easy, and gluten-free, but also very fragile and delicate, breaking quite easily when transferring it to a pie dish. I knew that I needed a more flexible dough that would be easy for everyone to make.

Thrive Market Guide to Alternative Flours Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Paleo

I’m happy to say that this gluten-free pumpkin pie is much easier to make and the dough is more forgiving than the older one I used. The pie crust is made with cassava flour, tapioca starch and a very tiny amount of xanthan gum, which acts as a binder that helps hold the dough together. It’s actually identical to the pie crust I use to make my Chicken Pot Pie, except that here I use a little less salt in the dough.

It used to be very hard to find these alternative flours. If you did manage to find them, they were super expensive. These days all you have to do is order from Thrive Market. Not only do they carry almost everything you’ll need to make this gluten-free pumpkin pie, but they also cost anywhere from 25-50% off retail prices.

New to Thrive Market?

Click here for 25% OFF your first order and a free 30-Day Trial Membership!

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Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie Paleo Primal Gourmet Easy Thanksgiving Dessert Recipe

The pumpkin pie filling is the same one I used in the first recipe I shared. Thankfully that didn’t need any tweaking and is about as good as it gets! It comes out super rich and decadent! The secret to making it taste extra special is a tiny bit of orange zest. The pumpkin and orange flavours work perfectly together along with the earthy spices. Just like the alternative flours, you can buy some great organic pumpkin puree on Thrive Market. I really like the Thrive Market Private Label products because they’re high-quality and a great price, but you can find other brands as well. Just be sure to look for pumpkin purees that are free of additives and sugars because they’re unnecessary.

Making Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie in Advance

You can prepare both the pie dough and the pumpkin pie filling in advance. I don’t know if I would let things sit in the fridge for more than 24 hours, so if you plan on making this for, say, Thanksgiving dinner, than maybe prepare the dough and filling the day before and let them sit in the fridge overnight.

The pie dough will get very hard in the fridge, making it difficult to roll out. So, you can either roll it out and refrigerate it on a flat surface, like a cutting board, between two pieces of parchment paper, or let it sit at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes before rolling it out.

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pie

For the Pie Crust

  • 1 cup cassava flour
  • ½ cup tapioca flour
  • 1.5 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1.5 teaspoons kosher salt
  • ¾ cup cold, unsalted butter or ghee cut into small cubes
  • 1 whole egg whisked
  • 2 tablespoons very cold water

For the Pumpkin Pie Filling

  • 1 15- ounce can organic (all-natural pumpkin puree)
  • 1/2 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup all-natural (organic maple syrup)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 tsp organic vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp fresh orange zest

For the Pie Crust

  1. In a large bowl, combine the cassava flour, tapioca flour, xanthan gum, and kosher salt. Stir until incorporated. Add the cold butter or ghee and use your hands to break it apart into the flour mixture until you have an even and crumbly consistency.
  2. Add the whisked egg and knead until you can form the dough into a ball. If your dough is too dry, add 1 or 2 tablespoons of cold water at a time. If your dough is too wet, add 1 or 2 tablespoons of cassava flour at a time. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight.
  3. Remove the dough from the fridge and roll it between two pieces of parchment paper dusted with cassava flour. Aim for an even thickness of around ¼-inch thick. If the dough crumbles, patch the cracks by pressing the dough with your fingers.
  4. Keep the dough between the parchment paper, place it onto a cutting board or similar surface and refrigerate until ready to use.
  5. Preheat the oven to 375F.
  6. Very carefully transfer the dough to a 10-inch pie dish. You can further mend the cracks directly in the pan. Use a fork to make holes in the bottom of the dough. Bake the unfilled dough for 15 minutes. Remove and let the pie dish cool on a wire rack while you prepare the filling.

For the Pumpkin Pie Filling

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl and whisk until combined, trying not to get too much air into the mixture.

Make the Pie

  1. Lower the oven to 350˚F.
  2. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust. Smooth the surface with the back of a spoon and gently tap the bottom of the dish to get rid of any air bubbles.
  3. Bake approximately 60 min or until the edges have firmed and the center has set and no longer jiggly.
  4. Remove from oven and let the filling cool fully before serving.

Disclaimer: Some of the links above are affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, I earn a small commission if you make a purchase. This is one of the ways I am able to support my blog.

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Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts – Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/sesame-garlic-brussels-sprouts http://cookprimalgourmet.com/sesame-garlic-brussels-sprouts#respond Sat, 09 Nov 2019 21:04:22 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5175

Crispy, juicy and bursting with flavour, these Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts are destined to be your new favourite side dish.

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Crispy, juicy and bursting with flavour, these Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts are destined to be your new favourite side dish. They’re incredibly easy, take 10 minutes to cook and are almost fool-proof. My only piece of advice is to quadruple the recipe because people will be fighting over these Brussels sprouts, kids included.

Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts Easy Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Thanksgiving Christmas Side DishesI’ve shared this magical technique for cooking Brussels sprouts before, but it’s worth repeating here. I wish I could take full credit for it, but it’s something I learned from an episode of the Splendid Table podcast. On Episode 618: Touring Harlem, Dan Souza from America’s Test Kitchen revealed the secret to perfectly caramelized yet juicy Brussels sprouts.

Pan-Roasted Brussels Sprouts Maple Mustard Vinaigrette Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 EasyPan-Roasted Brussels Sprouts Maple Mustard Vinaigrette Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy

The Brussels sprouts are cut in half and placed cut-side down in a cold skillet with a generous amount of oil. The skillet is then covered with a lid and placed over medium-high heat. As the heat gradually rises, the cut-sides of the Brussels sprouts start to caramelize while releasing moisture that simultaneously steams them. After only 5 minutes, a crust develops and the lid is removed to further caramelize the sprouts. After another 4-5 minutes they’re perfectly cooked.

No blanching, no flipping halfway, no additional steps required. The results are always incredible as long as you trust the process and don’t start peaking under the lid. It truly is a thing of beauty!

Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts Easy Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Thanksgiving Christmas Side Dishes

The Brussels sprouts are so good that they can be enjoyed with little more than a pinch of salt and squeeze of lemon. For added flavour, I decided to make a simple Sesame Garlic vinaigrette with only a few ingredients. The flavours really work well with the Brussels sprouts and it looks beautiful on the table.

I should mention that because the Sesame Garlic vinaigrette has a tiny splash of honey, it is not Whole30. However, honey is a natural sweetener and considered Paleo-friendly. You could also substitute maple syrup or agave syrup for slightly different flavour profiles.

Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts Easy Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Thanksgiving Christmas Side Dishes

Can I Make These Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts in Advance?

They do taste best when cooked immediately before serving but yes, they can be made in advance.

I recommend cooking the Brussels sprouts one batch at a time so that you get a really nice caramelization on the bottom of each half. I usually manage to fit 1 pound of Brussels sprouts in a 12″ sauté pan and this tends to feed two people as a side dish.

I would then place the cooked sprouts onto a baking sheet or oven-safe casserole dish and keep them in a warm oven around 200F while you cook the remaining Brussels sprouts.

Just keep in mind that the longer they sit in the oven the more chance they will dry out. But you should be able to keep them warm for at least an hour in advance.

Before serving, toss them in the vinaigrette while they’re still warm and serve immediately.

Sesame Garlic Brussels Sprouts – Paleo

Crispy, juicy and bursting with flavour, these Sesame Garlic Brussels
Sprouts are destined to be your new favourite side dish.

  • 3 tablespoons Extra Virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 clove garlic (thinly sliced)
  • 1 red chili pepper (such as finger or Anaheim, thinly sliced)
  • kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 pound raw Brussels sprouts
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons avocado oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds (for garnish)
  1. In a mason jar, combine the olive oil, rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, honey, garlic, and chili pepper. Season with salt and pepper to taste and shake until emulsified. Taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. Set aside at room temperature.
  2. Rinse the Brussels sprouts and dry thoroughly. Trim their bottom ends and cut in half, lengthwise.
  3. Add avocado oil to a cold, 12″ stainless-steel sauté pan. Lay Brussels sprouts, cut-side down, in the pan in a single layer. Do not over crowd the pan.
  4. Cover the skillet with a lid, place over med-high heat and cook until the bottoms of the Brussels sprouts start to develop a crust, around 5 minutes. Remove lid and cook until the Brussels sprouts are deeply caramelized, around 4 more minutes.
  5. Transfer the cooked Brussels sprouts to a bowl, drizzle half of the vinaigrette overtop and toss to coat.
  6. Arrange dressed Brussels sprouts on a serving platter, drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette and garnish with sesame seeds. Serve immediately.

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Easy No-Knead Bread – Not Whole30 or Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/easy-no-knead-bread http://cookprimalgourmet.com/easy-no-knead-bread#comments Sat, 02 Nov 2019 20:31:44 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=5147

This no-knead bread is easy. So easy that you could make it with your eyes
closed. Sure, you'd make a mess, but it CAN be done!

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Is this no-knead bread Paleo? Nope.

Is it Whole30? Not even close!

Gluten-Free? I’m afraid not (but I am working on a no-knead bread that doesn’t taste like sheet metal).

So why on earth am I publishing a recipe for a gluten-rich, carb-loaded, grain-based, no-knead bread on a blog that caters exclusively to the development and sharing of Paleo, Whole30 and gluten-free recipes? Great question! Let me explain…

Easy No-Knead Bread Primal Gourmet

When I started this blog back in 2015, I made it my life’s mission to ONLY share Paleo and Whole30 recipes that were, therefore, by default, free of gluten, grains, refined sugars, dairy, and alcohol. The reason was two-fold.

First and foremost, these types of recipes were the ones I cooked and ate most often. In fact, they still are. Out of about 21 meals in a week, I would say that 17 of them are either Paleo or Whole30. Some of them are even Keto. The other 4 are some type of indulgence or treat. Sometimes it’s a cheeseburger, pizza, Thai food, sushi, piece of pie, or slices of homemade bread schmeared with butter.

For those who haven’t read my Paleo story, I’ll quickly summarize by saying that back in 2013, I began a health journey that helped me lose over 40 pounds and rehabilitate my relationship with food. It was my personal experience and physical transformation that ultimately led me to start my blog and share recipes that were easy and healthy, but never sacrificed flavour. I wanted other people to know that there was an entire world of possibilities when it came to eating delicious foods without feelings of guilt, bloating, lethargy, and inflammation. If I could reach just one person that was struggling the way I used to, I would consider all of the work and effort a success.

Easy No-Knead Bread Primal Gourmet

The second reason I wanted to keep this blog exclusively Paleo and Whole30 was because of impact. This is something I’ve taken very seriously from day one. I wanted my presence in the food space to be a positive one and for a long time I struggled with finding a balanced way of sharing more of my Food Freedom in my social media and blog, even though it plays an important role in my ability to sustain a healthy life. Keep in mind, I started my blog and social media channels at a time when those pictures of towering pastas, cheese-pulls and giant pizza slices were just starting to go viral.

I definitely didn’t want to contribute to that type of content and thought that if I shared indulgent and unhealthy recipes (even though I occasionally eat them myself), that others would follow suit. Perhaps even worse, people might get the misguided impression that it would be OK for them to eat this way because Ronny ate this way. After all, if Ronny is eating it and Ronny was able to lose all this weight, then I can do it too!

The only reason I even have this strange, ego-centric thought is because it’s one of the ways I used to justify eating junk food myself. If I’m being honest, there’s a part of me that still tries to do this. I would often see some ripped guy in a restaurant chowing down on a juicy cheeseburger, muscles and veins bulging out of his neck. And there I was, overweight, depressed, staring down at a salad with no dressing, thinking to myself, If that guy’s eating a burger then it must be OK for me to eat one too! Of course, I had no idea who this person was or what their life was like. I was just looking for any excuse and justification to order a burger.

The only problem is that at that time (we’re talking every day from c.1995 to 2013), I had a really messed up relationship with food and zero self-control. So, I would call the server over, get myself a burger, side of fries, large coke, and some ranch dressing for my salad, because there’s no way I’m throwing out food. Feeling instantly good about my decision, I’d devour my meal and convince myself that I would hit the gym that evening to burn things off. Of course, I’d just end up going home, turning on a movie and crashing on the couch before the sun set. Only to wake up from a carb-induced nap and be so damn hungry but tired that I would order a large pizza because the last thing I wanted to do was cook or eat healthy. Oh yeah, I would also need to subdue any feelings of guilt I had for not having gone to the gym like I wanted. Naturally, I would wash the pizza down with a six-pack of beer or bottle of wine.

Easy No-Knead Bread Primal Gourmet

Believe me, the above pattern is not a healthy way to live. But neither is completely abstaining from foods that bring joy and comfort (like no-knead bread). I’ve been down that road too. All it did was bring me back full circle. There is a happy medium, though. I assure you. But the medium is entirely dependent on the person (you) and no one can figure it out for you. People can offer suggestions, advice, recipes, meal plans, and workout routines. They can try to sell you magic pills, potions and lotions that promise pounds lost by days passed and a lifetime of easy health thereafter. The truth is, none of that sh*t works if you don’t put in the work. Sometimes that work is in the gym. Sometimes it’s in your head. Sometimes it’s in the kitchen. But it’s work all the same.

I see things differently now. I think it’s just as detrimental for people to believe that I (or anyone else for that matter) exclusively eat Paleo and Whole30. Sustaining a 100% paleo diet is, in my experience, not an easy thing to do. It’s possible, and I can manage to do it for months at a time, but it’s difficult nonetheless.

So, in an effort to be a bit more transparent and helpful, I may start to share recipes that fall outside the lines of Paleo and Whole30. They would still be healthier than anything that comes in a package and most things you could buy in a store. But, as in my real life, it would only be occasionally, and hopefully without such a long and drawn out caveat!

In the grand scheme of things, my hope is that at the very least people are making the foods themselves, thereby having more control over ingredients and what goes in their body.

Whoa! OK! Things really took a turn for the serious there! I mean, geez, it’s just a loaf of bread, Ronny! haha

Easy No-Knead Bread – Not Paleo or Whole30!

This no-knead bread is easy. So easy that you could make it with your eyes
closed. Sure, you'd make a mess, but it CAN be done!

  • 375 grams all purpose or bread flour (preferably sifted )
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon dry (active yeast)
  • 1.5 cups hot water (around 110˚F)
  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt and yeast and stir through. Add the water and stir with a silicon spatula until fully combined (the dough should be quite sticky). Cover the bowl with a damp towel and set it aside in a warm spot on your counter for 3 hours or until the dough has doubled in size.
  2. Place a Dutch oven with a lid in the oven and preheat to 450F.
  3. Meanwhile, dust a work surface with flour and transfer the dough onto it. Dust the top of the dough with more flour and gently fold over the bottom of dough back onto itself (the bottom part is on the bottom of the bowl). Pinch the folds together (this creates surface tension) and flip the dough so that it is top-side up. Use your hands to shape the dough into a large ball.
  4. Transfer the dough, bottom-side down, onto a shallow bowl lined with parchment paper.
  5. When the oven is preheated, place the dough with the parchment paper directly into the hot Dutch oven. Cover with the lid and bake for 30 minutes.
  6. Remove the lid and cook for an additional 10 to 20 minutes depending on how much colour you want on your bread.
  7. Let the bread cool on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before slicing.

Original recipe via JennyCanCook. Adapted here to use 375 grams flour, rather than 3 cups originally called for. I noticed that 3 cups was too inconsistent of a measure for me.

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Paleo Chicken Pot Pie http://cookprimalgourmet.com/paleo-chicken-pot-pie http://cookprimalgourmet.com/paleo-chicken-pot-pie#respond Mon, 28 Oct 2019 23:00:53 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4988

This Paleo Chicken Pot Pie is the real deal. It's creamy, rich, delicious and hearty. It's the ultimate comfort food for the fall and winter months.

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This Paleo Chicken Pot Pie is the real deal. It’s creamy, rich, delicious and hearty. It’s the ultimate comfort food for the fall and winter months.

Paleo Chicken Pot Pie Primal Gourmet Easy Recipe

Paleo Chicken Pot Pie

This Paleo Chicken Pot Pie is the real deal. It's creamy, rich, delicious and hearty but also gluten-free and grain-free.

For Pie Crust:

  • 1 cup cassava flour
  • ½ cup tapioca flour
  • 1.5 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1.5 teaspoons kosher salt
  • ¾ cup cold butter or ghee (cut into small cubes)
  • 1 whole egg (whisked)
  • 2 tablespoons very cold water

For Chicken Filling

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium carrots (peeled and diced)
  • 1 celery stalk (diced)
  • 1 yellow onion (diced)
  • 1 head of broccoli (stems separated, peeled and diced, florets finely chopped)
  • Kosher salt
  • 3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 1 tablespoon arrowroot starch
  • 1.5 cups chicken stock
  • ½ cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (roughly chopped)
  • 4 roasted chicken quarters or 1 whole roasted chicken (skin removed and meat shredded)
  • Freshly-cracked black pepper
  • 1 egg (whisked)
  • 1 tablespoon water

For Pie Crust:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the cassava flour, tapioca flour, xanthan gum, and kosher salt. Stir until incorporated. Add the cold butter and use your hands to break it apart into the flour mixture until you have an even and crumbly consistency.
  2. Add the whisked egg and knead until you can form the dough into a ball. If your dough is too dry, add 1 or 2 tablespoons of cold water at a time. If your dough is too wet, add 1 or 2 tablespoons of cassava flour at a time. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight.
  3. Remove the dough from the fridge and roll it between two pieces of parchment paper dusted with cassava flour. Aim for an even thickness of around ¼-inch thick. If the dough crumbles, patch the cracks by pressing the dough with your fingers.
  4. Keep the dough between the parchment paper, place it onto a cutting board or similar surface and refrigerate until ready to use. The dough can be made 24 hours in advance if refrigerated.

For the Chicken Filling:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400F.
  2. Preheat a 12” cast-iron or stainless-steel skillet over medium-high heat. Add olive oil and let heat for 60 seconds. Add carrot, celery, onion and the broccoli stems. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until the onions are soft and translucent. Add garlic and cook 60 seconds.
  3. Add arrowroot starch and cook, stirring, 60 seconds. Add the chicken stock and stir to incorporate. Add the coconut milk and bring to a gentle simmer.
  4. Add the thyme and broccoli florets and stir to combine. Stir in the shredded chicken and bring everything to a simmer.
  5. Remove the dough from the fridge and carefully lay it overtop of the skillet. Use a paring knife to cut any pie crust that drapes over the edge. Make an “X” in the center of the crust with the knife to allow some steam to release during cooking.
  6. In a small bowl, whisk together one egg and one tablespoon of water. Brush the top of the pie crust with the egg wash mixture.
  7. Place the skillet on a sheet pan to catch any drips and bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until the pie crust is golden brown.
  8. Remove from oven and serve.

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Herb Crusted Prime Rib – Reverse-Seared, Paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/herb-crusted-prime-rib-reverse-seared-whole30-paleo http://cookprimalgourmet.com/herb-crusted-prime-rib-reverse-seared-whole30-paleo#respond Wed, 16 Oct 2019 00:00:08 +0000 http://cookprimalgourmet.com/?p=4890

Herb Crusted Prime Rib is the perfect main course for a holiday dinner! Whether Thanksgiving or Christmas, it's sure to please a crowd and super easy!

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We celebrated Canadian Thanksgiving last night and this Herb Crusted Prime Rib was definitely the star of the show. I coated the prime rib in a compound butter with plenty of herbs and reverse-seared on my Traeger Grill for 2 hours to develop a delicious wood-fired flavour. To finish, I seared it in a screaming hot cast-iron skillet and basted with plenty of the rendered butter and meat juices. It was insanely delicious and everyone loved it!

Herb Crusted Prime Rib Reverse Seared Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Day Recipe

Reverse-searing is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. Instead of searing the herb crusted prime rib first and finishing it in the oven, you slowly raise the internal temperature of the rib roast in a low-temperature grill or oven (anywhere between 225F and 275F) before searing it over very high heat. You can then finish it over a grill or in a cast-iron skillet to develop a crust.

I’ve explained the process before, but I don’t mind going over it again here with this herb crusted prime rib. I should also mention that this method can be used for everything from your favourite steak, a rack of lamb, thick-cut pork chops, or a whole tenderloin.The practical applications of the reverse-seared technique is actually very far-reaching.

Herb Crusted Prime Rib Reverse Seared Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Day Recipe

In theory, reverse-searing works similar to a sous-vide, which entails cooking foods in an oxygen-free environment (usually a vacuum-sealed plastic bag) under a temperature-controlled water bath. The heat of the water is regulated to precise degree by a circulator. Until recently, sous-vide circulators were very expensive. More affordable options are now available but I have yet to bite the bullet and purchase one for myself.

I often refer to reverse-searing as the “Poor Man’s Sous-Vide” because it doesn’t require any fancy or expensive equipment. You can reverse-sear in your oven but for the absolute best flavour, I highly recommend a Traeger Grill. It is an total game changer and by far the easiest grill I have ever used – bar none. Seriously, it can’t be beat.

Both methods (sous-vide and reverse-searing) result in very evenly cooked proteins. As you can see in the images, the rib roast is cooked medium-rare from edge to edge with very minor grey spots (which occur from the searing process).

THINGS YOU’LL NEED FOR THE REVERSE-SEARED TECHNIQUE

  1. Meat Thermometer. This really won’t work unless you have a meat thermometer. For accuracy, I recommend getting a digital one like this Lavatools model.It’s affordable and accurate. Unless you’re cooking in a professional setting, there is absolutely no need to get an expensive one. You’re better off spending that extra coin on a grass-fed, organic rack of lamb.
  2. A Cooling Rack + Sheet Pan Combo: You want air circulating around the meat so that it cooks evenly on all sides. This is easily achieved by placing it on an oven-safe cooling rack set over a sheet pan. Ideally, you want to make sure that the size of the cooling rack corresponds to that of the baking sheet beneath it, like this one.This will help with easy clean up because when your done cooking you can simply fill the baking tray with hot, soapy water and submerge the inverted cooling rack in it to ease off grease and any hardened pieces of meat/fat.
  3. A Carbon-Steel of Cast-Iron skillet:If you don’t have a grill to sear the meat after it has slowly roasted in the oven, the next best thing is a carbon-steel or cast-iron skillet. I always recommend this Lodge model for cast-iron because it’s inexpensive and really is the best bang-for-your-buck pan you can buy. For carbon-steel, Made In has recently released a great one that I’ve been using for a few months now.

Herb Crusted Prime Rib Reverse Seared Paleo Primal Gourmet Whole30 Easy Thanksgiving Day Recipe

Herb-Crusted Prime Rib – Reverse-Seared

  • 4.5-5 pound prime rib roast (2 bones)
  • Kosher salt
  • ½ cup room temperature butter (substitute ghee for Whole30)
  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage
  • freshly-cracked black pepper
  1. Pat prime rib dry with paper towel and generously season all sides with salt. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours to overnight.
  2. When ready to cook, remove prime rib from fridge and let stand at room temperature for 1 hour. Pat dry with paper towel.
  3. Preheat Traeger or oven to 250F.
  4. In a bowl, combine the butter, parsley, rosemary, thyme and sage. Mix until incorporated.
  5. Evenly spread the mixture on all sides of the rib roast. Generously season all sides with black pepper and place the roast on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet.
  6. Transfer to the Traeger or bottom rack of your oven and cook until the internal temperature reaches 120F (assuming you like your meat medium-rare), approximately 2 hours for a 5 pound roast. If using a Traeger, insert the meat probe into the thickest part of the roast for an accurate temperature reading.
  7. Preheat a cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add the rib roast along with 2 tablespoons of the rendered butter reserved in the baking sheet. Cook 60 seconds, using a large spoon to continuously baste the roast as it sears in the skillet. Flip and cook an additional 60 seconds, continuing to baste. Repeat on all sides until a crust develops on the outside of the meat and the internal temperature of the roast reaches 135F.
  8. Transfer to a carving board and let it rest 10 minutes before carving.
 

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